What We Are Reading Today: Save Me the Plums by Ruth Reichl

Updated 13 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Save Me the Plums by Ruth Reichl

This is a memoir that covers Ruth Reichl’s time as editor of the famed food magazine, Gourmet.

Reichl’s writing about her experiences with food has always been “fascinating and great, but this one is also interesting for what she experienced in the magazine publishing world, especially at a difficult time for that industry,” said a review published in goodreads.com.

“It has lots of details about what made her decide to take the job and the work she did and the fights she took on to update and elevate the magazine,” the review added. 

“There are also a lot of stories about the challenges (and what she did not enjoy)- courting advertisers, feeling like the low rung on the ladder as publishers were shifted around, the struggle to create the magazine when budgets were slashed,” it added. 

“The chapters in which she talks about the abrupt end of Gourmet were touching and sad. There’s passion and humor in this story, and Reichl’s writing is always so completely engaging and unpretentious.” 


What We Are Reading Today: Jefferson’s Legal Commonplace Book by Thomas Jefferson

Updated 24 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Jefferson’s Legal Commonplace Book by Thomas Jefferson

  • This authoritative volume is the first to contain the complete text of Jefferson’s notebook

As a law student and young lawyer in the 1760s, Thomas Jefferson began writing abstracts of English common law reports. Even after abandoning his law practice, he continued to rely on his legal commonplace book to document the legal, historical, and philosophical reading that helped shape his new role as a statesman. Indeed, he made entries in the notebook in preparation for his mission to France, as president of the US, and near the end of his life. 

This authoritative volume is the first to contain the complete text of Jefferson’s notebook, says a review on the Princeton University Press review. With more than 900 entries on such thinkers as Beccaria, Montesquieu, and Lord Kames, Jefferson’s Legal Commonplace Book is a fascinating chronicle of the evolution of Jefferson’s searching mind.

Unlike the only previous edition of Jefferson’s notebook, published in 1926, this edition features a verified text of Jefferson’s entries and full annotation, including essential information on the authors and books he documents. 

In addition, the volume includes a substantial introduction that places Jefferson’s text in a legal, historical and biographical context.