‘A hunter’s hope’: Snaring birds in warring Afghanistan

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Jan Agha, 49, an Afghan hunter, inspects a crane in a field in Bagram, Parwan province, Afghanistan April 10, 2019. (REUTERS)
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Jan Agha, 49, an Afghan hunter, feeds his cranes at a field in Bagram, Parwan province, Afghanistan April 10, 2019. (REUTERS)
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Jan Agha, 49, an Afghan hunter, gives water to his cranes at a field in Bagram, Parwan province, Afghanistan April 10, 2019. (REUTERS)
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Jan Agha, 49, an Afghan hunter, guides a crane towards cages at a field in Bagram, Parwan province, Afghanistan April 10, 2019. (REUTERS)
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Jan Agha, 49, an Afghan hunter, feeds his cranes at a field in Bagram, Parwan province, Afghanistan April 10, 2019. (REUTERS)
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Jan Agha, 49, an Afghan hunter, tries to catch his crane at a field in Bagram, Parwan province, Afghanistan April 10, 2019. (REUTERS)
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Jan Agha, 49, an Afghan hunter, has breakfast at his hunting field in Bagram, Parwan province, Afghanistan April 10, 2019. (REUTERS)
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Jan Agha, 49, an Afghan hunter, carries artificial cranes at a field in Bagram, Parwan province, Afghanistan April 10, 2019. (REUTERS)
Updated 15 April 2019
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‘A hunter’s hope’: Snaring birds in warring Afghanistan

  • The war has left much of the environment near Kabul devastated with uncleared mines, pollution, uncontrolled building and general neglect

BAGRAM, Afghanistan: As the early morning light breaks over the plain north of Kabul, bird hunter Jan Agha checks his snares as he has done for the past 30 years, hoping to catch a crane, using a tethered bird to lure others down to the nets.
Bird hunting is an ancient sport in Afghanistan, where local and migrating species have flocked for thousands of years and where even amid the chaos of the past 40 years of conflict, the tradition persists.
“I have learned different types of hunting from my ancestors because they were hunters too,” said 49-year-old Jan Agha, a farmer in Parwan province.
“Some of my sons have learned hunting from me and I hope to see at least two of my sons become hunters so my name is remembered and people know my sons after my death.”
The war has left much of the environment near Kabul devastated with uncleared mines, pollution, uncontrolled building and general neglect. Only in the last few years has there been an effort to restore areas like the former royal hunting grounds at Kol-e-Hashmat Khan in the city’s southwest.
Spring is the season of cranes, which the hunters try to catch alive in snares, using a specially trained tethered bird whose cries attract passing flocks.
“I like this crane because it won’t be silent when the other big groups of cranes come, and it always forces them to come down. I like it because he is really a hunter bird.”
With environmental controls virtually non-existent, there is little check on how many birds are caught or shot and Jan Agha, who started hunting when he was around 12 or 13, reckons he has taken more than 1,000 cranes and an uncountable number of quails, ducks hawks and sparrows.
The birds are usually taken to shops near the town of Bagram or to Kabul itself, where there is a popular bird market in the center of the old city.
For Jan Agha, hunting is a relief, taking him out of the daily round and into the harshly beautiful countryside, where groups of hunters set out in the night, picnicking at night in the desert before testing their skills at dawn.
“The pleasure of hunting is to be in open space. I like the mountain, desert, shotgun and being awake during the night to hunt,” he said. “The pleasure of hunting is to be a success in it. A hunter’s hope is hunting. Being a success in every job in the world has a special pleasure.”


Need to vent some anger? Jordan opens ‘Axe Rage Rooms’

Updated 18 April 2019
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Need to vent some anger? Jordan opens ‘Axe Rage Rooms’

  • People can demolish old items as well as smash plates and glasses — but for the price of $17
  • So-called rage rooms have been opening up around the world

AMMAN: In an underground room in Amman, a small group of Jordanians swing giant hammers at an old television, computer and printer, wrecking the machines, and then hit a car windscreen, shattering the glass into tiny pieces.
In the “Axe Rage Rooms,” people can vent their anger and frustration by demolishing old items as well as smashing plates and glasses.
“This is simply a place to break things and vent,” co-founder and general manager Ala’din Atari said. “A place where people come when they’re looking for a new experience... walking into a room with various items which they can break.”
So-called rage rooms have opened around the world, drawing visitors who want let their hair down and unleash some anger.
At the “Axe Rage Rooms,” where the experience costs $17, participants wearing protective suits and helmets wrote the issues bothering them on a blackboard — “ex-girlfriends,” “boss” and “all boyfriends,” the words becoming the targets of their anger.
Atari said his venue, which has seen about 10 clients a day in the month since it opened, had a space for couples, where the pair enter two rooms separated by a reinforced glass window.
“I wanted to try something new and...it was great,” said Ayla Alqadi, 23, after chucking old kitchenware at the window — behind which stood a friend.
“I felt like I had extra energy, it was a way to channel all the negativity inside, everything you feel inside you can release here.”