Egypt’s transport ministry puts brakes on false Facebook account

A 3D plastic cut-out of the Facebook logo is seen in this illustration. (Reuters)
Updated 15 April 2019
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Egypt’s transport ministry puts brakes on false Facebook account

  • A weekly round-up of bogus reports and phony facts in the mainstream and social media

1 Phony Facebook account affiliated with minister 

A spokesman for Egypt’s Transport Ministry has denied that its minister has an official Facebook account.

Mohammad Ezz said in a statement that social media accounts attributed to Egyptian minister Kamel al-Wazir are fake. 

Ezz warned that the ministry is not responsible for any news or statements published on these accounts.

He added that legal procedures will be taken against those who manage these accounts.

 

2 Kuwait rejects claims of not assisting citizens 

The Kuwaiti Embassy in Khartoum has rejected social media claims that it is failing to assist Kuwaiti citizens wanting to return home from Sudan due to the political situation there.

It is reported that social media users have been sharing a voice recording allegedly belonging to a Kuwaiti citizen complaining that the embassy did not fulfill its duties in helping him and a group of other Kuwaitis in Sudan seeking to return home. 

According to the Kuwaiti News Agency, the embassy confirmed its commitment to serve Kuwaiti citizens in Sudan. 

“We have received a phone call from the mentioned Kuwaiti citizens who requested help, and the embassy has expressed its commitment to do so.

“We were surprised to receive a call  from an official at the Saudi Arabian Embassy informing us that Kuwaiti citizens are present at the embassy … The embassy contacted the citizens to find out why they did not go directly to it.” 


Facebook says it stored ‘millions’ of unencrypted Instagram passwords

Updated 19 April 2019
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Facebook says it stored ‘millions’ of unencrypted Instagram passwords

  • The California firm reaches an estimated 2.7 billion people with its core social network, Instagram and messaging applications

SAN FRANCISCO, US: “Millions” of Instagram users had their passwords stored in unencrypted form on internal servers, Facebook said Thursday, raising its original estimate of tens of thousands.
“We discovered additional logs of Instagram passwords being stored in a readable format. We now estimate that this issue impacted millions of Instagram users,” Facebook said in a blog post.
“We will be notifying these users as we did the others. Our investigation has determined that these stored passwords were not internally abused or improperly accessed,” the social network said.
Facebook, Instagram’s parent company, revealed last month that the unencrypted passwords of hundreds of millions of users had been stored, putting the number of Instagram users affected in the tens of thousands.
The social network’s handling of user data has been a flashpoint for controversy since it admitted last year that Cambridge Analytica, a political consultancy, used an app that may have hijacked the private details of 87 million users.
Facebook has announced a series of moves to tighten handling of data, including eliminating most of its data-sharing partnerships with outside companies.
The California firm reaches an estimated 2.7 billion people with its core social network, Instagram and messaging applications.