Words and consequences: A look at the Omar and Trump feud

US Democratic Party Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnessota, left, and US President Donald Trump. (Reuters photos)
Updated 16 April 2019
0

Words and consequences: A look at the Omar and Trump feud

  • Omar accuses Trump of encouraging violence and fomenting extremism
  • Trump says national security is at issue and Omar is “ungrateful”

WASHINGTON: President Donald Trump isn’t backing down from his tweets about Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar, one of the first Muslim women to serve in Congress.
In fact, he spoke at an event in Omar’s home state of Minnesota on Monday amid a ferocious fight over her comments about the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
Omar, a Somali-American, says it’s more than a rhetorical squabble, and that lives, including hers, are at stake. Trump says national security is at issue and Omar is “ungrateful.”
A look at the latest rhetorical battle between the pair that’s more broadly about race and whether leaders and their words should be blamed for violence.
___
The aftershocks
Omar says she’s faced increased death threats since Trump spread around a video that purports to show her being dismissive of the 2001 terrorist attacks. “This is endangering lives,” she said, accusing Trump of fomenting extremism. “It has to stop.”
Her statement late Sunday followed an announcement by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that she has taken steps to ensure the safety of the Minnesota Democrat. Pelosi also urged Trump to take down the video.
The video soon disappeared as a pinned tweet at the top of Trump’s Twitter feed, but it was not deleted.
Trump further escalated his rhetoric Monday morning, tweeting that, “Before Nancy, who has lost all control of Congress and is getting nothing done, decides to defend her leader, Rep. Omar, she should look at the anti-Semitic, anti-Israel and ungrateful US HATE statements Omar has made.”

Later Monday, Trump announced he was heading to “the Great State of Minnesota!” Omar responded by retweeting that post with the comment, “The Great State of Minnesota, where we don’t only welcome immigrants, we send them to Washington.”
Minnesota has the largest concentration of Somalis in the nation, and most of those are in the Minneapolis area.
On Monday at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Pelosi said: “I don’t think any president of the United States should use the tragedy of 9/11 as a political tool. I think that is wrong, I think it’s beneath the dignity of the office.”

A coalition of community organizations gather n support of Minnesota Representative Ilhan Omar outside the Nuss Truck and Equipment in Burnsville, Minnesota where US President Donald Trump spoke on April 15, 2019. (AFP)

___
What Omar said
Omar told a Los Angeles gathering of the Council on American-Islamic Relations on March 23 that many Muslims saw their civil liberties eroded after the Sept. 11 attacks.
“For far too long we have lived with the discomfort of being a second-class citizen and, frankly, I’m tired of it, and every single Muslim in this country should be tired of it,” she said in the speech, according to video posted online. “CAIR was founded after 9/11, because they recognized that some people did something and that all of us were starting to lose access to our civil liberties.”
CAIR was founded in 1994, according to its website, but its membership skyrocketed after the attacks.
___
How Trump reacted
The president on Friday retweeted a video that pulled “some people did something” from Omar’s speech and included news footage of the hijacked planes hitting the Twin Towers. Trump also tweeted, “WE WILL NEVER FORGET!“
The president elevated criticism largely from Omar’s political opponents and conservatives who say Omar’s phrasing offered a flippant description of the assailants and the attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people.
Neither Trump’s tweet nor the video included Omar’s full quote or the context of her comments.
In Minnesota, Trump kept his remarks at a trucking company in Burnsville mostly focused on the 2017 GOP-passed tax cut.

Trump supporters gather outside the Nuss Truck and Equipment in Burnsville, Minnesota where US President Donald Trump spoke on April 15, 2019. (AFP)


___
Who echoed Trump
Other prominent GOP voices joined Trump in criticizing Omar.
“First Member of Congress to ever describe terrorists who killed thousands of Americans on 9/11 as ‘some people who did something,’” tweeted Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas. The retired Navy SEAL lost his right eye in 2012 in an explosion in Afghanistan.
“Here’s your something,” the New York Post blared on a cover beneath a photograph of the flaming towers.
Fox News Channel host Brian Kilmeade said on a “Fox & Friends” segment on Omar, “You have to wonder if she’s an American first.”
___
Life and death...
Omar has been the target of threats in the past. She tweeted back at Kilmeade and Crenshaw: “This is dangerous incitement, given the death threats I face.”
“My love and commitment to our country and that of my colleagues should never be in question. We are ALL Americans!“
An upstate New York man was charged recently with making death threats against her.
___
Safety
Members of the Congressional Black Caucus said in a conference call Monday they are concerned for Omar’s safety, especially as Trump campaigned in Minnesota. Chairwoman Karen Bass said whipping up “outrage” over Omar “further puts her life in danger.”
Added House Homeland Security Chairman Bennie Thompson: “Members of Congress should be free to give their opinions on subjects without fear of threat of bodily harm.”
“I’m concerned about it and the notion that, if your thinking is different from the president’s, you become a target.”
___
Associated Press Errin Haines Whack contributed to this report.


Vulture with GPS tracker held in Yemen on suspicion it was used for spying

Updated 37 min 23 sec ago
0

Vulture with GPS tracker held in Yemen on suspicion it was used for spying

  • The bird migrated from Bulgaria, to Turkey, to Jordan, Saudi Arabia and then Yemen
  • Govt forces detained the bird on suspicion that the attached GPS tracker was a spy device for Houthi militants

SANAA: Griffon vulture Nelson crossed into war-torn Yemen in search of food but ended up in the hands of Yemeni fighters — and temporarily in jail for suspected espionage.
The sand-colored bird came down in the country’s third city of Taiz, an unusual move for a young vulture that can soar for long distances across continents in search of food and moderate weather.
Nelson, approximately two years old, embarked on his journey in September 2018 from Bulgaria, where his wing was tagged and equipped with a satellite transmitter by the Fund for Wild Fauna and Flora (FWFF).
But he seems to have lost his way, eventually coming down into Taiz — under siege by Houthi rebels but controlled by pro-government forces, who mistook Nelson’s satellite transmitter for an espionage device and detained the bird.
Forces loyal to the government believed that the GPS tracker attached to the bird may have been a spy device for the rebels.
Hisham Al-Hoot, who represents the FWFF in Yemen, traveled from the rebel-held capital Sanaa to Taiz to plead with local officials to release the helpless animal.
“It took about 12 days to get the bird,” he told AFP.
“The Bulgarian foreign ministry reached out to the Yemeni ambassador, who in turn contacted local officials (in Taiz) and told them to immediately give the organization the vulture.”
Hoot said that the bird migrated from Bulgaria, to Turkey, to Jordan, Saudi Arabia and then Yemen — where the FWFF lost track of the bird.
Nelson was MIA until April 5, when the conservation group received hundreds of messages from Yemenis concerned about the creatures’ welfare.
Today, the locally-famous vulture is being properly fed and getting stronger every day.
“When we first took him, he was in very bad condition,” said Hoot, adding that the bird was underweight.
Smiling, he puts on gloves and carefully handles the majestic creature — blowing it a kiss.
Hoot said the bird will be released in two months when he believed Nelson will have regained his full strength and his wing — broken somewhere during his journey — will have healed.
“We thought at first it would take six months for him to heal, but now we don’t think it will be more than two months,” he said.
Hoot said that Nelson was not able to find any source of sustenance in Yemen.
“They can eat carcasses of dead animals, but now there is no more with the current situation of war.
“This is what forced him to come down and stopped him from completing his journey.”
The four-year conflict in Yemen has unleashed the world’s worst humanitarian crisis, according to the United Nations, with millions facing famine.
The war escalated in March 2015 when a coalition, led by Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, intervened to bolster the efforts of Yemeni President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi.
Since then, at least 10,000 people — most of them civilians — have been killed and more than 60,000 wounded, according to the World Health Organization. Other rights groups estimate the toll could be much higher.