Inji Aflatoun, Egyptian painter and feminist, gets Google Doodle for her 95th birthday

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Inji Aflatoun, one of Egypt’s best-known painters and a leading feminist, was honored with a Google Doodle to celebrate what would have been her 95th birthday. (Google)
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Prisoners, 1957, oil on canvas by Inji Aflatoun. (Courtesy Barjeel Art Foundation)
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Donshway, 1958, oil on wood by Inji Aflatoun. (Courtesy Safarkhan Art Gallery)
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Loom, 1955, oil on canvas by Inji Aflatoun. (Courtesy Safarkhan Art Gallery)
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Martyrs Procession, oil on canvas by Inji Aflatoun. (Courtesy Safarkhan Art Gallery)
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Mathbahat Dinshaway (the Dinshaway Massacre), c. 1950, ink on paper by Inji Aflatoun. (Courtesy Barjeel Art Foundation)
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Soldier (Fedayeen), 1970, oil on canvas on wood by Inji Aflatoun. (Courtesy Safarkhan Art Gallery)
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Tarqab (expectation), c. 1940, ink on paper by Inji Aflatoun. (Courtesy Barjeel Art Foundation)
Updated 16 April 2019
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Inji Aflatoun, Egyptian painter and feminist, gets Google Doodle for her 95th birthday

  • The doodle features Aflatoun in front of her canvas of surrealist and cubist paintings

DUBAI: Inji Aflatoun, one of Egypt’s best-known painters and a leading feminist, was honored today with a Google Doodle to celebrate what would have been her 95th birthday.

The doodle features Aflatoun in front of her canvas of surrealist and cubist paintings, which led critics to call her a “pioneer of modern Egyptian art,” according to Google’s description of the creative talent.

Aflatoun was born in Cairo in 1924 to a Muslim family that she described was “semi-feudal and bourgeois” — her father, Hazzan, was an entomologist who founded the entomology department of Cairo University aside from being the dean of the science faulty; her mother Salha, meanwhile, was a French-trained dress-designer who served in the women’s committee of the Egyptian Red Crescent Society.

Under the mentorship of her private art tutor, Kamel Al-Timisani, Aflatoun was introduced to surrealist and cubist aesthetics.

Aflatoun was also drawn into the feminist movement, joining Iskra – a Communist youth party – in 1942, and becoming a founding member of the League of University and Institutes’ Young Women in 1945 and representing the league during the same year at the first conference of Women’s International Democratic Federation in Paris.

She also wrote two political pamphlets — “Eighty Million Women with Us” in 1948 and “We Egyptian Women” in 1949 — which heavily attacked class and gender oppression, mainly because of British rule.

She was arrested and imprisoned by Gamal Abdel Nasser’s government during a round-up of communists in the mid-50s, and since her release in 1963 devoted her time to painting.

Aflatoun died on April 17, 1989, just a day after celebrating her 65th birthday.


Myriam Fares apologizes to Egyptian fans after backlash

Lebanese pop superstar Myriam Fares has apologized to her Egyptian fans over comments she made at a press conference. (File: AFP)
Updated 24 June 2019
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Myriam Fares apologizes to Egyptian fans after backlash

DUBAI: Lebanese pop superstar Myriam Fares has apologized to her Egyptian fans over comments she made at a press conference for the Moroccan Mawazine Festival on Saturday.

In a press appearance before her gig at the music festival, the star was questioned by a journalist and asked why she doesn’t perform in Egypt as much as she used to.

“I will be honest with you,” she told the journalist, “I’ve grown over the years and so did the pay and my demands, so it became a bit heavy on Egypt.”

The comment triggered intense backlash on social media, with many offended Twitter users using the platform to vent.

Egyptian singer and actor Ahmed Fahmi, who starred alongside Fares in a 2014 TV show, He replied to her comments sarcastically, tweeting: “Now you are too much for Egypt. Learn from the stars of the Arab world. You will understand that you did the biggest mistake of your life with this statement.”

Then, Egyptian songwriter Amir Teima tweeted: “Most Lebanese megastars like Elissa, Nawal (El Zoghby), Nancy (Ajram), Ragheb (Alama), and the great Majida El-Roumi have performed in Egypt after the revolution. You and I both know they get paid more than you do. Don’t attack Egypt; if it’s not out of respect, do it out of wit.”

Now, Fares has replied to the comments and has blamed the misunderstanding on her Lebanese dialect, saying: “I always say in my interviews that although I started from Lebanon, I earned my stardom in Egypt. I feel sorry that my Lebanese dialect and short reply created chances for a misunderstanding.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Myriam Music (@myriammusicofficial) on

She ended her Instagram apology by saying, “Long live Egypt.”