Need to vent some anger? Jordan opens ‘Axe Rage Rooms’

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A participant smashes items at Axe Rage Room, where people can express their anger in an entertaining way in Amman, Jordan. (Reuters)
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Customers smash items at the Axe Rage Room, where people can express their anger in an entertaining way in Amman, Jordan. (Reuters)
Updated 22 April 2019
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Need to vent some anger? Jordan opens ‘Axe Rage Rooms’

  • People can demolish old items as well as smash plates and glasses — but for the price of $17
  • So-called rage rooms have been opening up around the world

AMMAN: In an underground room in Amman, a small group of Jordanians swing giant hammers at an old television, computer and printer, wrecking the machines, and then hit a car windscreen, shattering the glass into tiny pieces.
In the “Axe Rage Rooms,” people can vent their anger and frustration by demolishing old items as well as smashing plates and glasses.
“This is simply a place to break things and vent,” co-founder and general manager Ala’din Atari said. “A place where people come when they’re looking for a new experience... walking into a room with various items which they can break.”
So-called rage rooms have opened around the world, drawing visitors who want let their hair down and unleash some anger.
At the “Axe Rage Rooms,” where the experience costs $17, participants wearing protective suits and helmets wrote the issues bothering them on a blackboard — “ex-girlfriends,” “boss” and “all boyfriends,” the words becoming the targets of their anger.
Atari said his venue, which has seen about 10 clients a day in the month since it opened, had a space for couples, where the pair enter two rooms separated by a reinforced glass window.
“I wanted to try something new and...it was great,” said Ayla Alqadi, 23, after chucking old kitchenware at the window — behind which stood a friend.
“I felt like I had extra energy, it was a way to channel all the negativity inside, everything you feel inside you can release here.”


Yoga teacher found alive after 17 days lost in Hawaii forest

In this image courtesy of Javier Cantellops and obtained at facebook.com/AmandaEllersMissing/, shows missing hiker Amanda Eller (2nd L) with her rescuers, (L-R) Javier Cantellops, Troy Helmer and Chris Berquist, on May 24, 2019, at Makawao Forest Reserve on the Hawaiian Island of Maui. (AFP)
Updated 26 May 2019
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Yoga teacher found alive after 17 days lost in Hawaii forest

  • Volunteers spent days scouring the thick forest around the trailhead where she parked

HAWAII: Rescuers in Hawaii have found a yoga instructor who went missing for 17 days while hiking in a forest reserve and survived by drinking from streams and eating plants.
Amanda Eller, 35, went hiking in Maui’s Makawao Forest Reserve on May 8 but became lost when she walked deeper in the reserve, which covers more than 2,000 acres, instead of heading back to her car as she believed.
Rescuers in a helicopter hired by her family spotted Eller on Friday afternoon in a ravine by a waterfall, miles from her vehicle.
“Sure enough, God willing, she was right there,” Javier Canetellops, a search coordinator who was in the helicopter, told reporters. “Unbelievable.”
Eller, who also works as a physical therapist, was malnourished, shoe-less, and had a broken leg and torn meniscus in her knee, as well as sunburn and scrapes. She was airlifted to a hospital and expected to make a full recovery.
Friends had launched a “Find Amanda” campaign on Facebook, and just an hour before she was rescued they offered a $50,000 reward for information. Volunteers spent days scouring the thick forest around the trailhead where she parked.
“Elated. Excited. Ecstatic,” Eller’s mother, Julia, told NBC News affiliate KHNL in Honolulu. “I can’t even put it into words I’m so incredibly grateful.”