What We Are Reading Today: Maybe You Should Talk to Someone by Lori Gottlieb

Updated 18 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Maybe You Should Talk to Someone by Lori Gottlieb

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone is revolutionary in its candor, pulling back the curtain on the therapeutic process and offering the rarest of gifts: An entertaining, illuminating, and quite possibly life-changing account of our own mysterious lives and our power to transform them. 

Author Lori Gottlieb is a therapist who shares her insights not only about her professional experience but her own journey through therapy. 

The book “helps normalize therapy for everyone, and her ability to share the profound growth both she and her patients experienced was so honest and refreshing,” said a review in goodreads.com. 

“While Gottlieb includes many important psychological concepts, her writing is clear and conversational and easy for anyone to engage with. There was a perfect balance with the personal stories that will also help her readers become more aware of their own obstacles and moments of growth as they move through this book,” the review added. 

Gottlieb is a New York Times bestselling author who writes the weekly “Dear Therapist” advise column for the Atlantic. 

A contributing editor for the Atlantic, she also writes for the New York Times Magazine, and is a sought-after expert on relationships, parenting, and mental health topics in media such as The Today Show, Good Morning America, CBS This Morning, CNN and NPR.


What We Are Reading Today: The Body Papers by Grace Talusan

Updated 24 May 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: The Body Papers by Grace Talusan

Grace Talusan’s memoir The Body Papers bravely explores her experiences with sexual abuse, depression, cancer, and life as a Filipino immigrant, supplemented with government documents, medical records, and family photos.

“Much of Talusan’s memoir will be familiar to any reader of immigrant narratives. But what renders the book memorable — perhaps what earned it the Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing — is the author’s unstinting self-portrait,” said Luis H. Francia in a review published in The New York Times.

“We see Talusan clearly in the present, warts and all, precisely through the stark, lucid representations of herself in the past. Having moved with her family from the Philippines to suburban America when she was two years old, Talusan recalls complex feelings of loss, displacement and adjustment,” the critic added.

A review published in goodreads.com said: “The generosity of spirit and literary acuity of this debut memoir are a testament to her determination and resilience. In excavating and documenting such abuse and trauma, Talusan gives voice to unspeakable experience, and shines a light of hope into the darkness.”