Alibaba head’s remarks spark debate over China working hours

Jack Ma said work should be a joy and also include time for study, reflection and self-improvement. (File/Reuters)
Updated 19 April 2019
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Alibaba head’s remarks spark debate over China working hours

  • Jack Ma is one of China's richest men and his comments last week brought both condemnation and support as China's more mature economy enters a period of slower growth

BEIJING: Remarks by the head of Chinese online business giant Alibaba that young people should work 12-hour days, six days a week if they want financial success have prompted a public debate over work-life balance in the country.
Jack Ma is one of China’s richest men and his comments last week brought both condemnation and support as China’s more mature economy enters a period of slower growth.
Newspaper People’s Daily, the ruling Communist Party’s mouthpiece, issued an editorial, saying mandatory overtime reflects managerial arrogance and was also impractical and unfair to workers. Online complaints included blaming long work hours for a lower birth rate in the country.
Ma has responded to the criticism by saying work should be a joy and also include time for study, reflection and self-improvement.


Libya's NOC concerned about theft and lawlessness affecting oil industry

Updated 9 min 21 sec ago
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Libya's NOC concerned about theft and lawlessness affecting oil industry

DUBAI/BENGHAZI: Libya’s state oil firm NOC is concerned about the country’s lawlessness affecting the oil industry, it said on Tuesday.
Equipment and machinery had been stolen at the headquarters at the NAGECO exploration firm, a NOC unit, it said in a statement. In another security incident a fuel truck was seized in southern Libya, it added.
The statement followed a suspected Daesh attack targeting Libya’s Zella oilfield on Saturday, in which three people were killed. 
The death toll was confirmed by the National Oil Company (NOC), which condemned the attack in a statement on Saturday evening.
The attackers struck at an entrance gate to the field, which lies near the town of Zella about 760 km (470 miles) southwest of the capital, Tripoli, before fleeing, according to the source and local residents who asked not to be named.
Daesh, which has re-emerged in Libya since an escalation in fighting created a vacuum in which it could operate, claimed responsibility for the attack through its Aamaq news agency later on Saturday.
The Zella field belongs to Zueitina Oil Company, which pumped 19,000 barrels per day on average in the last quarter of 2018 across all its fields.
Libya’s NOC chief said on Saturday continued instability in the country could cause it to lose 95 percent of oil production.
Libya’s oil and gas revenues reached $1.87 billion in April, up 22 percent from the previous month as oil prices rose, the NOC said on Sunday.