India suspends Kashmir border trade with Pakistan

The cross-border trade is based on a barter system, with traders exchanging goods including chillies, cumin, mango and dried fruit. (File/AFP)
Updated 19 April 2019
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India suspends Kashmir border trade with Pakistan

  • Kashmir has been on edge since a February suicide attack that killed 40 Indian paramilitaries
  • India said it had reports that trade on the border was being “misused by Pakistan-based elements for funnelling illegal weapons, narcotics and fake currency”

NEW DELHI: India has suspended trade across its disputed Kashmir border with Pakistan, alleging that weapons and drugs are being smuggled across the route, as tensions simmer between the nuclear-armed neighbors.
Kashmir has been on edge since a February suicide attack that killed 40 Indian paramilitaries and brought the two countries to the brink of war with cross-border air strikes.
On Thursday, India’s government, which is in the middle of a tough national election, said it had reports that trade on the border was being “misused by Pakistan-based elements for funnelling illegal weapons, narcotics and fake currency.”
It also said many of those trading across the Line of Control, which divides Kashmir into zones under Indian and Pakistani control, had links to militant organizations.
The home ministry said trade would be suspended until a stricter inspection mechanism is in place.
The cross-border trade is based on a barter system, with traders exchanging goods including chillies, cumin, mango and dried fruit.
It began in 2008 as a way to improve strained relations between New Delhi and Islamabad, who have fought two of their three wars over the disputed region.
The Indian Express newspaper said Friday that 35 trucks carrying fruit traveling from the Indian side of the border had been stopped after the government order.
Trade on the border has been suspended before, including in 2015, when India accused a Pakistani driver of drug trafficking.
The latest move comes after India withdrew “Most Favoured Nation Status” — covering trade links — from Pakistan after the February attack, which was claimed by the Pakistan-based Jaish-e-Mohammed Islamist group.
Islamabad has denied any involvement in the attack.
India’s Hindu nationalist Prime Minister Narendra Modi has made national security a key plank of his re-election campaign, pointing to the recent flare-up of violence as he battles the center-left opposition Congress party.
He is seeking a second term from the country’s 900 million voters in the mammoth election which kicked off on April 11 and runs till May 19. The results will be out on May 23.


WEEKLY ENERGY RECAP: China distracts from Strait of Hormuz

In this May 5, 2019 photo issued by Karatzas Images, showing the British oil tanker Stena Impero at unknown location, which is believed to have been captured by Iran. (AP)
Updated 19 min 17 sec ago
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WEEKLY ENERGY RECAP: China distracts from Strait of Hormuz

  • China’s economy slowed to the weakest pace since quarterly data began in 1992 amid the ongoing trade standoff with the US, while monthly indicators provided signs of some stabilization emerging

RIYADH: Crude oil prices deteriorated despite rising tensions in the Arabian Gulf toward the end of the week. Brent crude prices dropped to $62.47 and WTI dropped to $55.63 per barrel.
WTI recorded its biggest weekly decline in seven weeks, having fallen sharply earlier in the week on hopes that the situation in the Gulf would improve along with parallel worries about global demand. At the same time, a major storm hurt output in the Gulf of Mexico, where production was down by almost a fifth in its wake.
We saw a continuation of the theme of previous weeks where the oil price largely ignored events in and around the Strait of Hormuz, even after Iran seized two British-flagged oil tankers.
Instead, the market reacted to Iran’s potential nuclear deal with the US that would include permanent enhanced nuclear inspections in return for the lifting of sanctions.
China’s crude oil throughput rose to a record in June, up 7.7 percent from a year earlier, following the start-up of two large new refineries. Crude oil processing reached 13.07 million bpd, beating the previous record in April of 12.68 million bpd.
Despite strong oil demand from China, oil prices slipped after Beijing posted its slowest quarterly economic growth in at least 27 years, reinforcing concerns about demand in the world’s largest crude oil importer.
China’s economy slowed to the weakest pace since quarterly data began in 1992 amid the ongoing trade standoff with the US, while monthly indicators provided signs of some stabilization emerging.
The International Energy Agency pounced on that news and published a shaky oil demand outlook and reduced its 2019 oil demand forecast to 1.1 million bpd, down from its initial forecast of 1.5 million bpd, due to the slowing global economy and the US.-China trade war.
Yet the economic impact of the US-China trade argument is not an oil market-reflective. Surprisingly, some economists suggest that the trade dispute could spark a global recession, sending incremental oil demand lower. This has caused growing concern about supply and poor economic growth that has pushed oil prices lower, based purely on sentiment.
Arabian Gulf crude grades have further strengthened backed by demand uptick from North Asian refineries.
Norway’s crude oil production slipped to the lowest in three decades to 1.38 million bpd in April from 1.387 million bpd in March and 1.531 million bpd a year ago.

Faisal Faeq is an energy and oil marketing adviser. He was formerly with OPEC and Saudi Aramco. Twitter:@faisalfaeq