World’s smallest baby boy set to go home in Japan

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Ryusuke Sekino, a 5-month-old boy who was just 258 grams (9 ounces) when born, sits in the arms of his mother Toshiko Sekino at a hospital in Azumino, Nagano Prefecture, central Japan, Friday, April 19, 2019. (AP)
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Six-month-old Ryusuke Sekiya (C) is pictured with his parents one day before his scheduled discharge from a hospital in Azumino, Nagano prefecture on April 19, 2019. (AFP)
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Ryusuke Sekino, a 5-month-old boy who was just 258 grams (9 ounces) when born, sits in the arms of his mother Toshiko Sekino, accompanied by his father Kohei Sekino, right, at a hospital in Azumino, Nagano Prefecture, central Japan, Friday, April 19, 2019. (AP)
Updated 20 April 2019
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World’s smallest baby boy set to go home in Japan

  • The smallest surviving girl was born in Germany in 2015 weighing 252 grams, according to a registry put together by the University of Iowa of the world’s tiniest surviving babies

TOKYO: The world’s smallest baby boy, who was born in October in Japan weighing as much as an apple, is now ready for the outside world, his doctor said Friday.
Ryusuke Sekiya was delivered via emergency Caesarean section, after 24 weeks and five days of pregnancy as his mother Toshiko experienced hypertension.
At 258 grams (9.1 ounces) he was even lighter than the previous record holder, another Japanese boy who weighed just 268 grams when he was born last year. That baby was discharged from a Tokyo hospital in February.
When Ryusuke was born on October 1, 2018, he measured 22 centimeters (8.66 inches) tall, and medical staff kept him in a neonatal intensive care unit.
They used tubes to feed him, sometimes taking cotton swabs to apply his mother’s milk to his mouth.
Nearly seven months later, the boy has grown 13 times in weight, now weighing over three kilogrammes. He will be released from Nagano Children’s Hospital in central Japan over the weekend.
“When he was born, he was so small, and it seemed as if he would break with a touch. I was so worried,” his mother Toshiko told reporters.
“Now he drinks milk. We can give him a bath. I am happy that I can see him growing,” she said.
The smallest surviving girl was born in Germany in 2015 weighing 252 grams, according to a registry put together by the University of Iowa of the world’s tiniest surviving babies.
The survival rate for tiny babies is substantially lower for boys than for girls.


You’ll never eat alone at the ‘LiverFuul’ street food cart

Updated 22 May 2019
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You’ll never eat alone at the ‘LiverFuul’ street food cart

  • Many Egyptians support Liverpool FC because of Mohammed Salah
  • The dishes are named after various players in the team

CAIRO: In Ain Shams, just east of Cairo, an ordinary street food outlet has been transformed into something of a shrine to English football club, Liverpool FC.

The LiverFuul cart is testament to two things — Egyptians’ love of the fava bean dish called fuul and their adoration of Egyptian Liverpool striker Mohammed Salah.

Somehow, owner Mohammed Ibrahim Sayed managed to marry his love of food and football to create the café that is drawing cheers and laughs on social media.

(Arab News)

And he didn’t stop with the pun-tastic name, Sayed also came up with a slogan for his outlet based on the football club’s own — he changed “You’ll Never Walk Alone” to “You’ll Never Eat Alone” and came up with a logo based on Liverpool’s.

“We were thinking about a start-up for Ramadan and we landed on the idea of a fuul cart, which many Egyptians visit for the suhoor meal,” Sayed told Arab News.

“As for the name, (it had) to be different and, at the same time, relevant and trendy. Nothing was more trending than Liverpool FC in Egypt because of our Egyptian player Mohammed Salah. That’s how we landed on LiverFuul.”

(Arab News)

And the quirky, football-related names don’t stop there, each dish on the menu is named after a Liverpool player.

Peckish customers can order Wijnaldum falafel, named after the Dutch player, while those after a hearty dish of fuul can order the Origi beans, named after another player.

Defender Virgil van Dijk also has a dish named after him.

(Arab News)

"After the success we have found on the street and on social media platforms, we are thinking of expanding and thinking of more vehicles in different places in Cairo," Sayed said. 

“The young people come from everywhere in Cairo, in addition to the people of the neighborhood,” Sayed added.