What We Are Reading Today: Unbecoming

Updated 22 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Unbecoming

Author: Anuradha Bhagwati

Unbecoming is a raw, unflinching memoir by a former US Marine captain chronicling her journey from dutiful daughter of immigrants to radical activist effecting historic policy reform.
Anuradha Bhagwati’s memoir offers a distinctive lens on the Marines.
The daughter of two well-known Indian economists, she graduated from Yale and dropped out of graduate school at Columbia, where her parents taught.
“A tale of heroic resilience grappling with the timely question of what, exactly, America stands for, Unbecoming is about one woman who learned to believe in herself in spite of everything. It is the kind of story that will light a fire beneath you, and inspire the next generation of indomitable female heroes,” said a review published in goodreads.com.
In the Marine Corps, Bhagwati held posts in Okinawa, Thailand and Camp Lejeune, and excelled as a marksman and runner.
V.V. Ganeshananthan says in a review published in The New York Times: “The book is at its most powerful when she writes about who she became in response to the violence the military trained her to commit.”


What We Are Reading Today: Grace Will Lead Us Home

Updated 21 July 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Grace Will Lead Us Home

Author: Jennifer Berry Hawes

Grace Will Lead Us Home is a deeply moving work of narrative nonfiction on the tragic shootings in 2015 at the Mother Emanuel AME church in Charleston, South Carolina.
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jennifer Berry Hawes provides a definitive account of the tragedy’s aftermath.
“With unprecedented access to the grieving families and other key figures, Hawes offers a nuanced and moving portrait of the events and emotions that emerged in the massacre’s wake,” said a review in goodreads.com.
It said “Grace Will Lead Us Home — an unforgettable and deeply human portrait of grief, faith, and forgiveness — is destined to be a classic in the finest tradition of journalism.”
Chris Lebron said in a review for The New York Times: “In Grace Will Lead Us Home, the sorrow of the massacre’s three survivors, and that of the relatives left to mourn the dead, is vividly rendered but not to the point of caricature. Similarly admirable are moments when she depicts the difficulties faced by Roof’s family without compelling us to feel for them what we feel for the victims and their relatives.”