Stubbed out: Japan university stops hiring smoking professors

Japan is stepping up its anti-smoking campaign ahead of the 2020 Olympics. (AFP)
Updated 23 April 2019
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Stubbed out: Japan university stops hiring smoking professors

  • Nagasaki University the first state-run university to introduce such a condition of employment
  • Japan is steppiing up an anti-smoking campaign ahead of the 2020 Olympics

TOKYO: A Japanese university has stopped hiring professors and teachers who light up, officials said Tuesday, as the nation steps up an anti-smoking campaign ahead of the 2020 Olympics.
Nagasaki University spokesman Yusuke Takakura said they have “stopped hiring any teaching staff who smoke,” although applicants who promise to kick the habit before taking up their post could still be offered employment.
The university will also ban smoking entirely on campus from August, opening a clinic for those who cannot give up, said Takakura.
“We have reached a conclusion that smokers are not fit for the education sector,” the spokesman said, adding that the university had sought legal advice and does not believe the policy contravenes discrimination laws.
Local media said it was the first state-run university to introduce such a condition of employment and the move comes after Tokyo’s city government passed strict new anti-smoking rules last year ahead of the 2020 Summer Games.
Japan has long been an outlier in the developed world, considered a smoker’s paradise where lighting up is allowed in many restaurants and bars.
Tokyo’s new laws ban lighting up at restaurants in the capital, regardless of size. Restaurants can set up separate indoor smoking areas, but customers cannot eat or drink there.
Smoking is also banned entirely on school premises from kindergartens to high schools, although space can be set aside outside university and hospital buildings.
The World Health Organization has given Japan its lowest rating for efforts to prevent passive smoking, and it even scores poorly in the region compared with countries like China and South Korea.
Despite that, tobacco use in Japan has been falling in line with a broader global trend.


You’ll never eat alone at the ‘LiverFuul’ street food cart

Updated 22 May 2019
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You’ll never eat alone at the ‘LiverFuul’ street food cart

  • Many Egyptians support Liverpool FC because of Mohammed Salah
  • The dishes are named after various players in the team

CAIRO: In Ain Shams, just east of Cairo, an ordinary street food outlet has been transformed into something of a shrine to English football club, Liverpool FC.

The LiverFuul cart is testament to two things — Egyptians’ love of the fava bean dish called fuul and their adoration of Egyptian Liverpool striker Mohammed Salah.

Somehow, owner Mohammed Ibrahim Sayed managed to marry his love of food and football to create the café that is drawing cheers and laughs on social media.

(Arab News)

And he didn’t stop with the pun-tastic name, Sayed also came up with a slogan for his outlet based on the football club’s own — he changed “You’ll Never Walk Alone” to “You’ll Never Eat Alone” and came up with a logo based on Liverpool’s.

“We were thinking about a start-up for Ramadan and we landed on the idea of a fuul cart, which many Egyptians visit for the suhoor meal,” Sayed told Arab News.

“As for the name, (it had) to be different and, at the same time, relevant and trendy. Nothing was more trending than Liverpool FC in Egypt because of our Egyptian player Mohammed Salah. That’s how we landed on LiverFuul.”

(Arab News)

And the quirky, football-related names don’t stop there, each dish on the menu is named after a Liverpool player.

Peckish customers can order Wijnaldum falafel, named after the Dutch player, while those after a hearty dish of fuul can order the Origi beans, named after another player.

Defender Virgil van Dijk also has a dish named after him.

(Arab News)

"After the success we have found on the street and on social media platforms, we are thinking of expanding and thinking of more vehicles in different places in Cairo," Sayed said. 

“The young people come from everywhere in Cairo, in addition to the people of the neighborhood,” Sayed added.