What We Are Reading Today: Red Meat Republic by Joshua Specht

Updated 25 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Red Meat Republic by Joshua Specht

  • Joshua Specht puts people at the heart of his story — the big cattle ranchers who helped to drive the nation’s westward expansion

By the late 19th century, Americans rich and poor had come to expect high-quality fresh beef with almost every meal. 

Beef production in the US had gone from small-scale, localized operations to a highly centralized industry spanning the country, with cattle bred on ranches in the rural West, slaughtered in Chicago, and consumed in the nation’s rapidly growing cities. 

Red Meat Republic tells the remarkable story of the violent conflict over who would reap the benefits of this new industry and who would bear its heavy costs, says a review on the University Press website.

Joshua Specht puts people at the heart of his story — the big cattle ranchers who helped to drive the nation’s westward expansion, the meatpackers who created a radically new kind of industrialized slaughterhouse, and the stockyard workers who were subjected to the shocking and unsanitary conditions described by Upton Sinclair in his novel The Jungle. 

Specht brings to life a turbulent era marked by Indian wars, Chicago labor unrest, and food riots in the streets of New York.

 


Dubai’s casual Peruvian outpost wants you to feel your food this Ramadan

Updated 39 min 43 sec ago
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Dubai’s casual Peruvian outpost wants you to feel your food this Ramadan

  • LIMA Dubai is offering set iftar menus at $54 per person during Ramadan
  • It is located at Dubai's City Walk

DUBAI: LIMA Dubai, a casual dining outpost of Peruvian cuisine in Dubai, is offering up a four-course iftar menu throughout the Holy Month featuring gems from the Latin American country.

To begin, we were offered a hearty Peruvian Aguadito Soup, with a chicken breast and potatoes steeped in a creamy blend of coriander and corn. Although the potatoes were rather underdone, the soup was flavorful, yet gentle — the perfect opener.

Next up was a pair of refreshing appetizers — a Salmon Tiradito and a Solterito Salad. The ceviche-style salmon with tiger’s milk was a tad bland, with the usually tangy Peruvian dressing failing to hit the right note. The salad, however, was a different story. Crunchy, deep-fried strips of beetroot were sprinkled over a springy, fresh mix of rocket leaves and olives, all dressed in a tantalizingly tangy Japanese mayonnaise dressing. Tiny pops of sweetcorn and soft chips of halloumi cheese offered up a mixture of textures in one of my favorite dishes of the night.

And on that note, the mains were served up and I discovered another gem — the Lamb Seco.

Unbelievably tender, the lamb slices were served atop a thick coriander-based sauce, with a pumpkin puree on the side, and were topped with crunchy swirls of slivered, fried pumpkin.

The Baby Chicken was served grilled after being marinated in a glaze of panka chili, which was also offered on the side as a pouring sauce. The fragrant chicken, which was slightly salty for my taste, was dished up on a bed of herbs in a clay case alongside a slightly-too-gloopy cassava puree with hunks of chorizo buried within.

Our colorful table was completed with a side dish of Tacu Tacu Lentils, a puree of pulses, rice and chilies topped with sharp, pickled red onions.

Textures played a big role in the carefully thought out menu and the dessert carried on with that theme.

A rich dark chocolate mousse with white chocolate ice cream and gritty, delicious chocolate soil  was one of the stars of the meal. For a quirky edge, discs of dark chocolate jelly adorned the plate to provide yet another textural element. The decision to pare down the competing flavors offered us the chance to feel the food and appreciate the crunch of the dark crumbs against a creamy, cold lick of ice cream.

LIMA Dubai is offering set iftar menus at $54 per person during Ramadan.