What We Are Reading Today: The Uninhabitable Earth by David Wallace-Wells

Updated 25 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: The Uninhabitable Earth by David Wallace-Wells

  • Wallace-Wells talks about humanity’s existential threats

The Uninhabitable Earth reveals the true pace and severity of climate change. 

Author David Wallace-Wells talks about humanity’s existential threats, but also how humans respond to this really urgent news. Some don’t want to know, others lapse into despair. 

“The author does a good job of pointing out that our future is really unknown. Most importantly, how will humans behave to try and save the biosphere. If somehow we all pull together we may be able to mute the worst of our possible futures. Also, he acknowledges that future technology is a possible game-changer, although he is not optimistic,” said a review published in goodreads.com.

“The author’s own career focuses on climate change, and he has all the sources and resources at his command. It shows clearly in the breath of data he draws on. And they are all connected, with feedback loops and knock-on effects that can magnify a bad situation into a disaster. Wallace makes those connections clear,” it added. 


What We Are Reading Today: The Body Papers by Grace Talusan

Updated 24 May 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: The Body Papers by Grace Talusan

Grace Talusan’s memoir The Body Papers bravely explores her experiences with sexual abuse, depression, cancer, and life as a Filipino immigrant, supplemented with government documents, medical records, and family photos.

“Much of Talusan’s memoir will be familiar to any reader of immigrant narratives. But what renders the book memorable — perhaps what earned it the Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing — is the author’s unstinting self-portrait,” said Luis H. Francia in a review published in The New York Times.

“We see Talusan clearly in the present, warts and all, precisely through the stark, lucid representations of herself in the past. Having moved with her family from the Philippines to suburban America when she was two years old, Talusan recalls complex feelings of loss, displacement and adjustment,” the critic added.

A review published in goodreads.com said: “The generosity of spirit and literary acuity of this debut memoir are a testament to her determination and resilience. In excavating and documenting such abuse and trauma, Talusan gives voice to unspeakable experience, and shines a light of hope into the darkness.”