What We Are Reading Today: The Uninhabitable Earth by David Wallace-Wells

Updated 25 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: The Uninhabitable Earth by David Wallace-Wells

  • Wallace-Wells talks about humanity’s existential threats

The Uninhabitable Earth reveals the true pace and severity of climate change. 

Author David Wallace-Wells talks about humanity’s existential threats, but also how humans respond to this really urgent news. Some don’t want to know, others lapse into despair. 

“The author does a good job of pointing out that our future is really unknown. Most importantly, how will humans behave to try and save the biosphere. If somehow we all pull together we may be able to mute the worst of our possible futures. Also, he acknowledges that future technology is a possible game-changer, although he is not optimistic,” said a review published in goodreads.com.

“The author’s own career focuses on climate change, and he has all the sources and resources at his command. It shows clearly in the breath of data he draws on. And they are all connected, with feedback loops and knock-on effects that can magnify a bad situation into a disaster. Wallace makes those connections clear,” it added. 


What We Are Reading Today: The British are Coming by Rick Atkinson

Updated 21 May 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: The British are Coming by Rick Atkinson

  • The British Are Coming “is a tale of heroes and knaves, of sacrifice and blunder, of redemption and profound suffering”

Rick Atkinson’s flair for the colorful detail of a country at war is demonstrated again in The British are Coming.

“This is a remarkable history of the first two years of the American Revolution. The research is deep and the topics covered are broad,” said a review published in goodreads.com.

The narrative “is told in chronological order making it easy to follow the events as they unfolded and making the connections between various dimensions clear to see. One gets a clear understanding of the context that underlies the action taken by both sides in the early years of the conflict,” it added.

Atkinson’ prose “is outstanding and makes the read pleasurable. It should be known by prospective readers that this is not just a military history; it is very much as well a fascinating political and cultural look at the times,” the review added. 

It said The British Are Coming “is a tale of heroes and knaves, of sacrifice and blunder, of redemption and profound suffering.”

Atkinson is a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and historian who worked for 25 years as a correspondent and editor for The Washington Post.