25 Venezuelan migrants reported missing after boat sinks

At least 25 Venezuelans have been declared missing after a boat carrying them sunk en route to the island of Trinidad on April 25, 2019. (Illustration photo from Shutterstock)
Updated 26 April 2019
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25 Venezuelan migrants reported missing after boat sinks

  • The victims are thought to migrants fleeing Venezuela's worsening political and economic crisis
  • At least nine others from the sunken boat had been pulled alive from the water,
CARACAS, Venezuela: Search teams combed the Caribbean on Thursday for 25 possible Venezuelan migrants missing after a boat sank in rough seas headed to the island of Trinidad, authorities said.
At least nine others from the sunken boat had been pulled alive from the water, while officials said they were struggling to pin down exactly how many people had gone missing.
The number initially believed to be on the boat increased because officials discovered that several onboard had not been listed as approved crew members or passengers, said Lt. Kerron Valere of the Trinidad and Tobago Coast Guard.
The small craft left Venezuela on Tuesday and overturned in the sea at some point not far from shore, Valere said in a statement.
The Venezuelan government did not immediately make public comments about the accident involving suspected migrants.
Valere said Venezuela was leading the search within that nation’s waters but the Trinidad and Tobago Coast Guard was assisting. He said the official manifest listed 25 people on the boat, but authorities had determined that at least 34 were on the vessel.
Venezuelan opposition lawmaker Robert Alcalá said that 25 boarded in the Venezuelan port of Güiria but others illegally got on at another stop along the coast. He said fishermen had rescued several people after the sinking.
Dozens of relatives of the missing were in Güiria anxiously waiting for word back from the search vessels, he said.
Alcalá told The Associated Press that Venezuela’s economic crunch of hyperinflation and food shortages drove the passengers — mostly women — onto the boat.
“They go to Trinidad because of the economic situation in this country,” he said.
In recent years, an estimated 3.7 million Venezuelans have fled the crisis-wracked country, where a political struggle is now playing out between US-backed opposition leader Juan Guaidó and socialist President Nicolás Maduro.
Most of Venezuela’s migrants travel by land into neighboring Colombia and Brazil, but others overload fishing boats to cross the sometimes deadly Caribbean waters to nearby islands.
Migrants often go to border cities and some Caribbean islands to work in the sex industry, allowing them to send money home to families back in Venezuela.
In January 2018, more than two dozen migrants were never found after a boat from Venezuela smashed onto rocks on the nearby Dutch island of Curacao. Officials said two people survived.
The missing boat overturned in strong waves near the island of Patos, a few miles off the Venezuelan coast. Some survivors were found drifting up to 34 miles (55 kilometers) from where the boat sank.
Seven security force vessels were searching for the missing, an official from the civil protection agency said. The official spoke to AP only on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly.
The online news website Daily Express quoted a Venezuelan living in Trinidad who said her sister could not be located. The 21-year-old was headed to the island to flee Venezuela because she said it lacked food and hospital care.


Monsoon flooding death toll rises to 152 in South Asia

Updated 20 July 2019
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Monsoon flooding death toll rises to 152 in South Asia

  • At least 90 people have died in Nepal and 50 in northeastern India’s Assam state over the past week
  • South Asia’s monsoon rains, which hit the region from June to September, are crucial for the rain-fed crops planted during the season

GAUHATI, India: The death toll in monsoon flooding in South Asia has risen to 152 as millions of people and animals continue to face the brunt in three countries, officials said Saturday.
At least 90 people have died in Nepal and 50 in northeastern India’s Assam state over the past week. A dozen have been killed in Bangladesh.
Shiv Kumar, a government official in Assam, said 10 rare one-horned rhinos have died in Kaziranga National Park since the Brahmaputra River burst its banks, flooding the reserve.
Some 4.8 million people spread over 3,700 villages across the state are still affected by the floods, though the frequency of rains has decreased in the past 24 hours, the Assam Disaster Response Authority said. More than 2.5 million have also been hit by flooding in India’s Bihar state.
Amid the flooding, 20-year-old Imrana Khatoon delivered her first baby on a boat in floodwaters early Friday while on her way to a hospital in Assam’s flooded Gagalmari village, locals said. The woman and the newborn were brought back to their home without getting to the hospital.
Community health worker Parag Jyoti Das, who visited the family, said there were no post-delivery health complications. However, the mother and the child were moved to a hospital on a boat to the nearby town of Jhargaon because of unhygienic conditions due to floodwaters, Das said. The health center in Khatoon’s village was flooded and closed.
“I would have felt happier if the baby’s father was here,” said Khatoon, whose husband works in a hotel in the southern state of Kerala.
More than 147,000 people have taken shelter in 755 government-run camps across Assam, officials said.
Authorities warned they would take action against suppliers who were reported to be distributing poor quality rice and other essentials to marooned people and inmates of temporary shelters at some places.
“We have ordered the arrest of those unscrupulous elements supplying substandard materials and playing with the lives of the affected people,” said Himanta Biswa Sarma, Assam’s finance minister.
In Nepal, the Home Ministry said about 36,728 families were affected by the monsoon rains. The flooding and mudslides forced some 13,000 families to flee their homes.
In at least two of Nepal’s districts, helicopters were used to transport emergency food supplies, while other transport means were being used to move tents and other supplies to the victims.
South Asia’s monsoon rains, which hit the region from June to September, are crucial for the rain-fed crops planted during the season.