Where We Are Going Today: Lily

Updated 02 May 2019
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Where We Are Going Today: Lily

Tired of revisiting the same place for brunch? If so, in Lily, Arab News has unearthed a gem of a restaurant.

Located on Prince Turki Al-Awwal Road, Riyadh, opposite the King Saud University women’s campus, Lily offers a varied breakfast and brunch menu to suit most palates.

The restaurant’s décor is delicate and floral with tables set around a large olive tree and two walls made up entirely of windows overlooking a row of tall plants. Another wall is covered in faux grass and dotted with roses, and the high ceiling and sun streaming through the windows give the dining room an airy feel.

The olive tree is fake, but the real olives on offer are tender and juicy, making the fresh breakfast platter a great choice for simple morning fare. Hungrier customers might enjoy the breakfast burrito, packed with crispy potatoes, bacon, Monterey Jack cheese and bright bell peppers.

Lily staff are friendly and accommodating to food allergies. Of the items we ordered, the clear winner was the crunchy French toast.

Open weekdays from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. and weekends from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., Lily’s might be the place to head on your next morning off.


What We Are Reading Today: The River Ki by Sawako Ariyoshi

Updated 25 May 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: The River Ki by Sawako Ariyoshi

The River Ki, short and swift and broad like most Japanese rivers, flows into the sea not far south of Osaka. On its journey seaward, it passes through countryside that has long been at the heart of the Japanese tradition. 

The River Ki dominates the lives of the people who live in its fertile valley and imparts a vital strength to the three women, mother, daughter and granddaughter, around whom this novel is built.

It provides them with the courage to cope, in their different ways, with the unprecedented changes that occurred in Japan between the last years of the last century and the middle of this century.

Sawako Ariyoshi, one of Japan’s most successful modern novelists, describes this social and cultural revolution largely through the eyes of Hana, a woman with the vision and integrity to understand the inevitability of the death of the traditional order in Japan, says a review published on googlereads.com.

Ariyoshi writes with a love for detail bound to a broader understanding of the importance of the geographical and biological forces that mold her characters — and the result is a story that flows with all the vitality of The River Ki itself.