EU leaders set to meet just after EU election

Parliament, which will convene on July 2 after being elected on May 23-26, is pushing the European Council of national leaders to nominate Juncker’s successor. (Shutterstock)
Updated 03 May 2019

EU leaders set to meet just after EU election

  • The meeting, similar to one held after the previous vote in 2014, would give leaders a chance to discuss their preferences for who will succeed Jean-Claude Juncker as president of the European Commission
  • Council President Donald Tusk is likely to announce plans for the special summit during a gathering of leaders in Sibiu, Romania next Thursday

BRUSSELS: National leaders of the European Union are likely to meet for a summit in Brussels on May 28, two days after a European Parliament election, to discuss who should run the EU executive for the next five years, officials said on Friday.
The meeting, similar to one held after the previous vote in 2014, would give leaders a chance to discuss their preferences for who will succeed Jean-Claude Juncker as president of the European Commission, three senior EU officials told Reuters.
Parliament, which will convene on July 2 after being elected on May 23-26, is pushing the European Council of national leaders to nominate Juncker’s successor from among the lead candidates of winning parties. But many national leaders are reluctant to accept this so-called Spitzenkandidat process.
Council President Donald Tusk is likely to announce plans for the special summit during a gathering of leaders in Sibiu, Romania next Thursday. They are due formally to nominate a Commission chief at a Brussels summit on June 20-21. The nominee would then require endorsement by the European Parliament.


Australia plans to censor extremist online content

Updated 26 August 2019

Australia plans to censor extremist online content

  • The country will create a 24/7 Crisis Coordination Center for monitoring and censorship
  • Australia earlier set up a task force with tech giants to address spread of extremist material online

SYDNEY: Australia plans to block websites to stop the spread of extreme content during “crisis events,” the country’s prime minister has said.
Speaking from the G7 in Biarritz Sunday, Scott Morrison said the measures were needed in response to the deadly attack on two New Zealand mosques in March.
The live-streamed murder of 51 worshippers “demonstrated how digital platforms and websites can be exploited to host extreme violent and terrorist content,” he said in a statement.
“That type of abhorrent material has no place in Australia, and we are doing everything we can to deny terrorists the opportunity to glorify their crimes, including taking action locally and globally.”
Under the measures, Australia’s eSafety Commissioner would work with companies to restrict access to domains propagating terrorist material.
A new 24/7 Crisis Coordination Center will be tasked with monitoring terror-related incidents and extremely violent events for censorship.
In the wake of the Christchurch attack, Australia set up a task force with global tech giants like Facebook, YouTube, Amazon, Microsoft and Twitter to address the spread of extremist material online.
It is not yet clear how the measures will be enforced. Morrison has previously suggested that legislation may come if technology companies do not cooperate.