Ramadan Recipes: Gooey cheese rolls by Ruya Dubai’s Chef Colin Clague

Updated 06 May 2019
0

Ramadan Recipes: Gooey cheese rolls by Ruya Dubai’s Chef Colin Clague

DUBAI: The great thing about this recipe is that it can be made ahead of time and kept frozen, then just brought out an hour or so before being needed and its quickly fried to break the fast.

It really is a simple recipe and the walnuts can easily be omitted in case of any any allergies and let’s be honest who doesn’t like a hot crispy fried snack full of gooey cheese?

Ingredients:

6 leaves of phyllo dough

15gr flat leaf parsley, chopped

10gr dill, chopped

60gr carrots shredded

120gr zucchini

4 eggs

300gr feta cheese

Handful of walnuts

Directions:

1. Thaw phyllo dough. Roll out and cut into triangles. Set aside any scraps you have but don’t throw away.

2. In a medium bowl, add the parsley, dill, carrot, zucchini, crumbled feta and egg yolk (reserve the egg white). Finely chop the extra phyllo dough and add in to mixture, stir to combine.

3. Fill each triangle with 1-2 spoons of the feta mixture. With a micro plane, grate the walnuts and roll up the dough into a cigar shape.

4. Glaze the outside with the egg yolk and secure each of the borek rolls by dipping into the egg and folding over, fry the borek in the oil until golden brown and crunchy at the ends.

5. Grate over some frozen feta and garnish with baby cress and herbs.

It really is a simple recipe and the walnuts can easily be omitted in case of any any allergies. Supplied

 


What We Are Reading Today: The River Ki by Sawako Ariyoshi

Updated 36 min 53 sec ago
0

What We Are Reading Today: The River Ki by Sawako Ariyoshi

The River Ki, short and swift and broad like most Japanese rivers, flows into the sea not far south of Osaka. On its journey seaward, it passes through countryside that has long been at the heart of the Japanese tradition. 

The River Ki dominates the lives of the people who live in its fertile valley and imparts a vital strength to the three women, mother, daughter and granddaughter, around whom this novel is built.

It provides them with the courage to cope, in their different ways, with the unprecedented changes that occurred in Japan between the last years of the last century and the middle of this century.

Sawako Ariyoshi, one of Japan’s most successful modern novelists, describes this social and cultural revolution largely through the eyes of Hana, a woman with the vision and integrity to understand the inevitability of the death of the traditional order in Japan, says a review published on googlereads.com.

Ariyoshi writes with a love for detail bound to a broader understanding of the importance of the geographical and biological forces that mold her characters — and the result is a story that flows with all the vitality of The River Ki itself.