Startup of the Week: House of Honey: Offering nature’s health tonic in its purest form

Updated 07 May 2019
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Startup of the Week: House of Honey: Offering nature’s health tonic in its purest form

Honey is nature’s gift to humanity. With so much reliance on commercial medicines and antibiotics, it is easy to overlook the amazing antiseptic and antibacterial properties that honey contains.

Rich in antioxidants, honey has many benefits linked to cardiovascular health, the treatment of wounds and acid reflux, and its popularity as a home remedy for ailments such as coughs or pharyngitis.

Saudi-based brand House of Honey aims to raise awareness of the benefits of the product and encourage people to use it as part of a lifestyle routine.

The business venture was established in the second quarter of 2017 by Saudi industrial engineers Mohammed Jamjoom, Abdulrahman Shalabi and Hassan Mutwalli.

“The idea came in late 2016 when we used pure honey as an energy booster,” Shalabi told Arab News. “When we found that there was a lack of reliable sources for trusted, pure honey in our market, we started to search for natural honey for our own consumption.

“We were able to find a trusted source for our use. During the process, we saw an opportunity in the market and pursued it. We realized that a high-quality Saudi brand would gain consumer trust and meet high expectations, while also contributing to a healthier future and well-being,” he added.

House of Honey currently offers 250g, 500g and 1kg jars of Hadrami Sidr, a type of honey specific to the Sidr tree in Hadramout, Yemen. Customers in Jeddah and Riyadh can have honey delivered for no charge and can find House of Honey products in concept stores Homegrown Market in Jeddah and Healthy Market in Riyadh.

House of Honey is developing its website to make it more user-friendly, while looking to increase its core distribution network with a range of natural honey products.

Shalabi said the company aimed to maintain consistency of quality and reliability of availability for its products.

Nutrition experts advise people to consume 250 grams of honey per month.


UN health agency seeks to halve number of snakebite deaths

In this Dec. 14, 2018, file photo, an African Bush Viper venomous snake is displayed for reporters at the Woodland Park Zoo, in Seattle. (AP)
Updated 25 May 2019
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UN health agency seeks to halve number of snakebite deaths

  • WHO’s strategy includes plans to increase global access to treatment and anti-venom

LONDON: The World Health Organization is publishing its first-ever global strategy to tackle the problem of snakebites, aiming to halve the number of people killed or disabled by snakes by 2030.
Nearly 3 million people are bitten by potentially poisonous snakes every year, resulting in as many as 138,000 deaths. Last week, Britain’s Wellcome Trust announced an 80 million-pound ($100 million) program to address the problem, saying there were new potential drugs that could be tested.
In a statement, Doctors Without Borders said it was “cautiously optimistic” WHO’s snakebite strategy could be a “turning point” in addressing snakebites.
The agency called the problem of snakebites “a hidden epidemic” and said most bites are treatable.
WHO’s strategy includes plans to increase global access to treatment and anti-venom.