US air strike kills 13 Daesh fighters in Somalia

Al Shabaab soldiers sit outside a building during patrol along the streets of Dayniile district in Southern Mogadishu. (File/Reuters)
Updated 10 May 2019
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US air strike kills 13 Daesh fighters in Somalia

  • The US military has stepped up its campaign of air strikes in Somalia since President Donald Trump took office, saying it has killed more than 800 militants in two years
  • Somalia has been mired in civil war and an extremist insurgency since 1991 when clan warlords overthrew a dictator and then turned on each other

NAIROBI: A US air strike killed 13 Daesh fighters in Somalia’s semi-autonomous Puntland region on Wednesday, the US military said, days after another strike killed three.
The US military has stepped up its campaign of air strikes in Somalia since President Donald Trump took office, saying it has killed more than 800 militants in two years.
Daesh has gathered recruits in Puntland, although experts say the scale of its force is unclear and it remains a small player compared Al-Qaeda-linked Al-Shabab group that once controlled much of Somalia.
US Africa Command (AFRICOM) said late on Thursday the latest strike targeted an Daesh-Somalia camp in Golis Mountains.
“At this time, it is assessed the air strike on May 8 killed 13 terrorists,” it said.
AFRICOM said in April it had killed Abdulhakim Dhuqub, identifying him as Daesh’s deputy leader in Somalia.
Somalia has been mired in civil war and an extremist insurgency since 1991 when clan warlords overthrew a dictator and then turned on each other.
Al Shabab was pushed out of the capital Mogadishu in 2011, but retains a strong presence in parts of southern and central Somalia and has often clashed with Daesh.


Portugal suspends visas for Iranians for 'security reasons'

Updated 16 July 2019
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Portugal suspends visas for Iranians for 'security reasons'

  • Foreign Minister Augusto Santos Silva said Portugal does not play around with entry into its territory

LISBON: Portugal has suspended the issuance of entry visas for Iranian nationals for unspecified security reasons, Foreign Minister Augusto Santos Silva told a parliamentary committee on Tuesday.
Answering a question from a committee member on whether such a move had been taken, Santos Silva said during the televised meeting: “Yes, we suspended those for security reasons ... I will provide explanations later, but not publicly.”
“Portugal does not play around with entry into its territory,” he added, without disclosing when the decision was taken.
The chairman declared the meeting closed after about two hours without further off-camera testimony.
Joao Goncalves Pereira, the lawmaker from the conservative CDS-PP party who asked the question, told Reuters: “We received information that visas for Iranians had been suspended for two or three weeks, and we just wanted to confirm that.”
He would not say what was the source of that original information or whether any Iranian nationals had complained about the situation.
Foreign ministry officials had no immediate comment and nobody was available for comment in the Iranian embassy in Lisbon.