Facebook and France haggle over regulating online hate

Friday’s meeting comes amid concern about hate speech and disinformation around this month’s European Parliament elections. (Shutterstock)
Updated 10 May 2019
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Facebook and France haggle over regulating online hate

  • Macron’s office is releasing a progress report Friday on a pilot project that allows French regulators to embed within Facebook’s facilities to observe how it monitors and removes racist or other content
  • Friday’s meeting comes amid concern about hate speech and disinformation around this month’s European Parliament elections

PARIS: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is meeting French President Emmanuel Macron as the tech giant and France try to pioneer ways of fighting hate speech and violent extremism online.
Macron’s office is releasing a progress report Friday on a pilot project that allows French regulators to embed within Facebook’s facilities to observe how it monitors and removes racist or other content.
Friday’s meeting comes amid concern about hate speech and disinformation around this month’s European Parliament elections. Macron is pushing for more online regulation on a European level, despite opposition from the US and free speech advocates.
Next week, the leaders of France and New Zealand will meet tech leaders in Paris for a summit seeking to ban acts of violent extremism and terrorism from being shown online.


Two journalists released in Libya: TV channel

Updated 25 May 2019
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Two journalists released in Libya: TV channel

  • The capital’s southern suburbs have been the target of an offensive launched April 4 by Khalifa Haftar
  • The release of the television journalists followed local and international condemnation of their detention

TRIPOLI: Two Libyan journalists held by an armed group for more than three weeks have been released, the television channel they work for said Saturday.
“We congratulate the press world for the release of our two colleagues, Mohamad Al-Gurj and Mohamad Al-Chibani, who were kidnapped by Haftar’s forces on May 2 while they were covering the assault on Tripoli,” said the private channel Libya Al-Ahrar, which is based in Turkey.
It said they were freed on Friday.
The capital’s southern suburbs have been the target of an offensive launched April 4 by Khalifa Haftar, military strongman of an eastern administration aimed at seizing Tripoli from an internationally-recognized Government of National Accord (GNA).
At least 510 people have been killed and around 2,500 wounded in the fighting, as well as more than 80,000 displaced, according to UN agencies.
The release of the television journalists followed local and international condemnation of their detention, including from media watchdog Reporters Without Borders (RSF).
In a press freedom index compiled by RSF, Libya ranks a lowly 162nd out of 180 countries.