Where We Are Going Today: Dijon Cafe

Updated 11 May 2019
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Where We Are Going Today: Dijon Cafe

  • The interior of the cafe is very beautiful, with brightly colored velvet sofas and bohemian style decorations

JEDDAH: With its prime location on the Corniche Road in Jeddah, overlooking the magnificent Red Sea, the Dijon Cafe is setting trends for people looking for new taste adventures.
It serves a wide variety of savory and sweet foods; but while there are some great sandwiches, including a tasty smoked turkey and haloumi offering, the cafe really excels with its coffee and sweet treats, particularly the rose-flavored options on the menu.
The delicious icing on its famous rose croissant, for example, emits a scent makes the experience all the better, even before you take a bite. Pair it with a rose coffee and, in addition to the amazing taste, the presentation of both will surpass all your expectations; with a dusting of dried rose petals sprinkled on top, they look like little works of art.
The interior of the cafe is very beautiful, with brightly colored velvet sofas and bohemian style decorations. There is also outdoor seating so that you can enjoy the sea view, which is a particularly attractive option on cooler days. Rounding off the wonderful experience are the staff, who are very accommodating and friendly.


UN health agency seeks to halve number of snakebite deaths

In this Dec. 14, 2018, file photo, an African Bush Viper venomous snake is displayed for reporters at the Woodland Park Zoo, in Seattle. (AP)
Updated 25 May 2019
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UN health agency seeks to halve number of snakebite deaths

  • WHO’s strategy includes plans to increase global access to treatment and anti-venom

LONDON: The World Health Organization is publishing its first-ever global strategy to tackle the problem of snakebites, aiming to halve the number of people killed or disabled by snakes by 2030.
Nearly 3 million people are bitten by potentially poisonous snakes every year, resulting in as many as 138,000 deaths. Last week, Britain’s Wellcome Trust announced an 80 million-pound ($100 million) program to address the problem, saying there were new potential drugs that could be tested.
In a statement, Doctors Without Borders said it was “cautiously optimistic” WHO’s snakebite strategy could be a “turning point” in addressing snakebites.
The agency called the problem of snakebites “a hidden epidemic” and said most bites are treatable.
WHO’s strategy includes plans to increase global access to treatment and anti-venom.