Saudi health ministry offers tips for Ramadan wellbeing

As fasting people spend up to 15 hours without food at a time, the ministry suggests starting iftar meals with dates, soup and light foods rich in vitamins and easy to digest. (SPA)
Updated 12 May 2019

Saudi health ministry offers tips for Ramadan wellbeing

  • As fasting people spend up to 15 hours without food at a time, the ministry suggests starting iftar meals with dates, soup and light foods rich in vitamins and easy to digest

RIYADH: As part of its efforts to raise awareness during Ramadan, the Saudi Ministry of Health has published dietary advice and tips on its Twitter and other social media sites for fasting Muslims.
The tips include a selection of foods perfect for rehydration, including vegetables and fruits, and of complex carbohydrates like brown bread which contribute to stabilizing blood sugar levels.
As fasting people spend up to 15 hours without food at a time, the ministry suggests starting iftar meals with dates, soup and light foods rich in vitamins and easy to digest. In addition, diversity is essential, with protein-rich ingredients including meat and dairy products contributing to cell building and a feeling of satisfaction and fullness.
Concentrated, canned and powdered juices, however, should be avoided, as they are high in sugar, artificial colors and flavors, and are poor in nutritional value. The instant hit of glucose to the body may offer short term relief, but will also lead to a spike in blood sugar levels, followed by a crash, causing fatigue and dehydration.

 


185 disabled Saudi children ready for new academic year

Updated 22 August 2019

185 disabled Saudi children ready for new academic year

RIYADH:  Saudi Arabia’s Disabled Children’s Association (DCA) finished its preparations for the new academic year with the completion of its educational programs aimed at developing children’s mental, cognitive and motor skills.

The DCA’s centers are getting ready to welcome around 185 new students, who will be enrolled in the preparatory and elementary stages. The association is also housing early intervention children in 11 centers throughout the Kingdom.

“The DCA’s centers finished their preparations early in line with the directives of Prince Sultan bin Salman bin Abdul Aziz, chairman of the association’s board of directors,” said Awadh Al-Ghamdi, the DCA’s secretary-general.

He added: “The association is keeping pace with new technologies by developing the educational care system every year. It continuously adopts new methods for children with special needs by providing the centers with what is necessary for the development of linguistic, social and psychological skills.

“The DCA held consultative meetings to approve an implementation mechanism by consulting experts from the educational committee at King Saud University about the importance of establishing an innovative resources room in all of the DCA centers.

Al-Ghamdi said: “The project will be implemented in cooperation with the Ministry of Education after it is judged by specialists from Saudi universities and adopted as part of the association’s initiatives. This comes as a continuation of the DCA’s role in caring for children with special needs for more than 35 years.”

The director of the DCA’s center in Al-Rass governorate presented the project’s original idea, which included reviewing the centers’ educational care programs according to modern educational trends.

A working group, which included a number of specialists, was assigned to the investigation. It presented a final vision to the DCA’s secretariat with a guide to the project’s implementation.