Emirates chief commercial officer Thierry Antinori resigns

Thierry Antinori pictured in 2014. (Reuters/File Photo)
Updated 12 May 2019
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Emirates chief commercial officer Thierry Antinori resigns

Reuters DUBAI: Emirates Chief Commercial Officer Thierry Antinori has resigned, a spokeswoman said on Sunday, days after the Dubai-based airline announced its weakest profit in a decade.
Antinori, also an executive vice president, was responsible for commercial operations, products, the frequent flyer program and cargo division, according to Emirates’ website.
The spokeswoman declined to comment when asked why Antinori resigned and when it was effective.
Antinori spoke to media in his capacity as an Emirates executive on April 24 in Dubai and was seen at the Emirates stand at a travel exhibition in Dubai on April 29.
Adnan Kazim, divisional senior vice president, strategic planning, revenue optimization & aeropolitical affairs, has been appointed acting CCO, the spokeswoman said.
Emirates reported a 69 percent fall in full-year profit last week, its lowest in 10 years as soaring fuel costs and a strong dollar took a toll on earnings, while passenger growth stalled.
Antinori joined Emirates as executive vice president for passenger sales worldwide in October 2011 and was promoted to CCO in June 2013, Emirates’ website shows.
Antinori said in 2016 he was contacted about becoming the Air France-KLM chief executive but that he was sticking with the Dubai-based carrier.


China’s crude oil imports from Saudi Arabia up 43%

Updated 25 May 2019
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China’s crude oil imports from Saudi Arabia up 43%

  • Imports grew to 1.53 million barrels per day compared with 1.07 million a year ago
  • Sinopec Group and China National Petroleum Corp., the country’s top state-owned refiners, are halting Iranian oil purchases for loading in May, three people with knowledge of the matter said

BEIJING: China’s crude oil imports from Saudi Arabia rose 43 percent in April, making the Middle Eastern OPEC kingpin once again the top supplier to the world’s second-biggest economy, boosted by demand from new private refiners.
Saudi imports grew to 6.30 million tons, or 1.53 million barrels per day (bpd) on a daily basis, compared with 1.07 million bpd in the year ago period, according to data from the General Administration of Customs released on Saturday.
Saudi shipments were supported by higher refinery run rates at Hengli Petrochemical Co. Ltd, with production at the 400,000 bpd-capacity refinery in northeast China expected to reach optimal levels in late June. About 70 percent of the feedstock for Hengli came from Saudi Arabia.
Meanwhile Russian supplies were 6.12 million tons, or 1.49 million bpd, up from 1.35 million bpd in April last year.
China in April imported 3.24 million tons of crude oil from Iran, or 789,137 bpd, up from March’s 541,100 bpd, as companies ramped up buying before the scrapping of sanctions waivers the US had granted to big buyers of Iranian oil.
China Petrochemical Corp. (Sinopec Group) and China National Petroleum Corp. (CNPC), the country’s top state-owned refiners, are halting Iranian oil purchases for loading in May, three people with knowledge of the matter said.
Venezuela shipments stood at 1.9 million tons, or 462,813 bpd in April, up 85 percent versus 249,700 bpd in March, while crude imports from Iraq were 3.31 million tons, or 806,372 bpd, down from 904,500 bpd the previous month.