Salam project trains dozens of young Saudis

The trainees would play a great role in positively representing their country. (SPA)
Updated 13 May 2019

Salam project trains dozens of young Saudis

  • ‘Kingdom’s current global status must be a source of pride for every citizen’

RIYADH: A training program, Salam for Cultural Communication, which aims to help portray Saudi Arabia positively, concluded on Saturday in Riyadh, the Saudi Press Agency reports.
60 trainees received instruction through practical exercises to present the Kingdom’s projects promoting humanitarianism, the Vision 2030 reform plan, Saudi society, women’s empowerment and co-existence with people from different religions and cultures.
Trainees also gained insight into working within diverse teams, in addition to acquiring a multitude of interpersonal skills, including in verbal communiction.
Dr. Fahd Al-Sultan is CEO of Salam for Cultural Communication which, according to its website, aims to present the “real image of the Kingdom and break down cultural stereotypes that can lead to bias.”
Al-Sultan said the information and skills acquired by the trainees would give them the opportunity to represent Saudi Arabia at international events and highlight its cultural status.
The trainees will, he said, play an influential role in positively representing and promoting their country, through their refined communication skills, with different people and cultures.
The Kingdom’s current global status must be a source of pride for every Saudi citizen, he added, because of the pace at which it is progressing on an almost daily basis, well on the way to cementing its place as a global leader.
Saudi Arabia aims to promote the use of dialogue to prevent and resolve global conflicts to enhance understanding and cooperation. In January, the Salam for Cultural Communication organized the two-day Saudi Salam Forum with a reminder of the importance of peaceful coexistence and communication between people of all nations and faiths.


VIDEO: Saudi mountaineer Mona Shahab on the charitable cause that helped drive her to the summit of Everest

Updated 21 August 2019

VIDEO: Saudi mountaineer Mona Shahab on the charitable cause that helped drive her to the summit of Everest

  • Shahab vows to continue her close friend's charitable work helping underprivileged children in Egypt

JEDDAH: A Saudi mountaineer who climbed Mount Everest this year has described how her commitment to her late friend’s charity helped drive her to the top of the world’s highest mountain.

 

 

Mona Shahab reached the highest point of the world on May 23 as part of a team of Arab women.

In an emotional video published this week, the mountaineer breaks down as she describes how her close friend and fellow mountaineer Marwa Fayed died in 2013 after complications during childbirth.

Shahab vowed to continue Fayed’s charitable work helping underprivileged children in Egypt, and used her Everest ascent to raise money for the cause.

“I’m doing it to help Marwa Fayed’s Toy Run give 300 children in underprivileged areas in Egypt a chance to be change agents in their communities,” Shahab says in the video posted by filmmaker and mountaineer Elia Saikaly, who documented their ascent.

In an interview with Arab News days before her successful ascent, Shahab spoke about how she hoped her ascent would inspire Saudi women.

“Saudi women can, Saudi women will, reach whatever heights they set their mind and heart to,” she said.

To help Shahab reach her fundraising goal, go to https://www.gofundme.com/f/Everest-for-365-Deeds-Forward