E-tailer Namshi’s Ramadan edit is for the savvy shopper

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Namshi offers a range of high street-priced options, as well as a few designer duds. (Supplied)
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Namshi offers a range of high street-priced options, as well as a few designer duds. (Supplied)
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Namshi offers a range of high street-priced options, as well as a few designer duds. (Supplied)
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Namshi offers a range of high street-priced options, as well as a few designer duds. (Supplied)
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Namshi offers a range of high street-priced options, as well as a few designer duds. (Supplied)
Updated 14 May 2019

E-tailer Namshi’s Ramadan edit is for the savvy shopper

  • This year’s modest edit features everything from casual, comfortable daywear to the more exquisite and elaborate eveningwear
  • The line also features busy, psychedelic kaftans, complete with a mish mash of animal print and traditional geometric patterns

Namshi sure knows how to reel shoppers in.  This Ramadan, the Middle Eastern apparel site has been running a promotion called “Suhoor Surprises” where everyday a new offer is released that expires within 24 hours. And the offers have been good — we’ve come across 40 percent off premium brands one day; 40 percent off shoes on another. Then there was the extra 40 percent off sale pieces, meaning some items were available for up to 80% off.

So, be warned — shopping on there can get addictive.

When it comes to its collections, Namshi offers a range of high street-priced options, as well as a few designer duds. Delivering to the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait and more, the site is home to more than 800 international and local brands and we always love their annual Ramadan collections.

This year’s modest edit features everything from casual, comfortable daywear to the more exquisite and elaborate eveningwear for special iftar and suhoor occasions.

Local brand Haya’s Closet never fails to disappoint, with a collection of chic and demure abayas starting from $54.

With lace-edged options and pleats, embellishments and applique galore, it’s easy to find abaya options for the various events that creep up on you during the month. The label also offers chic abayas in shades other than black, with one beige, appliqued number standing out as particularly stylish.

The line also features busy, psychedelic kaftans, complete with a mish mash of animal print and traditional geometric patterns. The digitally printed silk fabric — which could get a little warm as temperatures climb — is embellished with tiny rhinestones for that extra sparkle.

For something even more colourful, Threadz features long and floaty maxi dresses with fun prints and patterns — the ankle-grazing hemlines and loose fits are perfect for evenings out in Ramadan.

The site also stocks a who’s who of shoes and accessories, which is ideal if you need a full look in a hurry. Whether it’s jewellery, watches or handbags, there’s a great variety of designers and brands to suit every budget, including Lost Ink, Ted Baker, Aldo and DKNY.


Plastic particles in drinking water present ‘low’ risk — World Health Organization

Updated 43 min 4 sec ago

Plastic particles in drinking water present ‘low’ risk — World Health Organization

  • WHO issues first report on microplastics in drinking water
  • Reassures consumers that risk is low, but says more study needed
GENEVA: Microplastics contained in drinking water pose a “low” risk to human health at current levels, but more research is needed to reassure consumers, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Thursday.
Studies over the past year on plastic particles detected in tap and bottled water have sparked public concerns but the limited data appears reassuring, the UN agency said its first report on potential health risks associated with ingestion.
Microplastics enter drinking water sources mainly through run-off and wastewater effluent, the WHO said. Evidence shows that microplastics found in some bottled water seem to be at least partly due to the bottling process and/or packaging such as plastic caps, it said.
“The headline message is to reassure drinking water consumers around the world, that based on this assessment, our assessment of the risk is that it is low,” Bruce Gordon of the WHO’s department of public health, environmental and social determinants of health, told a briefing.
The WHO did not recommended routine monitoring for microplastics in drinking water. But research should focus on issues including what happens to chemical additives in the particles once they enter the gastrointestinal tract, it said.
The majority of plastic particles in water are larger than 150 micrometers in diameter and are excreted from the body, while “smaller particles are more likely to cross the gut wall and reach other tissues,” it said.
Health concerns have centered around smaller particles, said Jennifer De France, a WHO technical expert and one of the report’s authors.
“For these smallest size particles, where there is really limited evidence, we need know more about what is being absorbed, the distribution and their impacts,” she said.
More research is needed into risks from microplastics exposure throughout the environment — “in our drinking water, air and food,” she added.
Alice Horton, a microplastics researcher at Britain’s National Oceanography Center, said in a statement on the WHO’s findings: “There are no data available to show that microplastics pose a hazard to human health, however this does not necessarily mean that they are harmless.”
“It is important to put concerns about exposure to microplastics from drinking water into context: we are widely exposed to microplastics in our daily lives via a wide number of sources, of which drinking water is just one.”
Plastic pollution is so widespread in the environment that you may be ingesting five grams a week, the equivalent of eating a credit card, a study commissioned by the environmental charity WWF International said in June. That study said the largest source of plastic ingestion was drinking water, but another major source was shellfish.
The biggest overall health threat in water is from microbial pathogens — including from human and livestock waste entering water sources — that cause deadly diarrheal disease, especially in poor countries lacking water treatment systems, the WHO said.
Some 2 billion people drink water contaminated with faeces, causing nearly 1 million deaths annually, Gordon said, adding: “That has got to be the focus of regulators around the world.”