Film review: Breaking up is hard to do

A still from ‘Someone Great.’ (Supplied)
Updated 15 May 2019
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Film review: Breaking up is hard to do

  • The film explores the friendship of three women in New York
  • It also explores the personal lives of the two supporting characters

“Someone Great,” the story of a young music critic struggling to end a nine-year relationship, arrives on Netflix at a time when films on female bonding are not exactly common.

There may have been “Girls Trip” or “Rough Night,” but in “Someone Great,” writer-director Jennifer Kaytin Robinson digs deeper into the camaraderie that women share as they face a turning point in their lives, with Gina Rodriguez playing the carefree Jenny in a very different role from her 2014 “Jane the Virgin.”

The film focuses on three friends living it up for one last night in New York before Jenny leaves for a dream job in San Francisco. Blair (Brittany Snow) and Erin (DeWanda Wise) try to comfort Jenny after a bad break-up with her former boyfriend Nate (Lakeith Stanfield). However, as the three women party through the night, Jenny struggles to keep memories of her former flame at bay.

However, “Someone Great” is not just about Jenny, but also looks at the dilemmas facing the two other central women, exploring their relationships and struggles, and neatly revealing their desire to break free as well as their inability to do so. They may play the typical “supportive best friends” that we are used to seeing in romcoms, but each has their their own problems — a refreshing approach in an often one-dimensional genre. 

Robinson, who had long wanted to make a movie on the influence of music on her life (the title is from a song with the same name), steers her story deftly, creating characters that young adults can identify with and delivering a sweetly sad narrative of fractured relationships. However, “Someone Great” is also painfully trendy at times, with a plot that is occasionally too light-headed to strike the right note.


‘Walk with a statement:’ The Nou Project announces new sneaker designs

Updated 25 May 2019
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‘Walk with a statement:’ The Nou Project announces new sneaker designs

  • The re-design came in three new colorways: Grey, burgundy and navy
  • The Nou Project was launched with the aim to broaden the way art is consumed and support emerging artists by providing them with a platform to gain recognition

DUBAI: Tucked away in Dubai’s artistic and cultural Alserkal Avenue, Saudi brand The Nou Project announced the latest re-design of its classic sneakers — the all-new ultra-low tops.

In a one-night only pop up in KAVE café, the brand’s founder, Nour Al-Tamimi, and co-designer, Basma Chidiac, announced the re-design that came in three new colorways: Grey, burgundy and navy.

“We want people to be able to walk with a statement,” Al-Tamimi told Arab News as she showed off her previous collections.

The pop up featured a 50 percent discount on all pairs, as well as two artists and a calligrapher available for buyers to customize any of the newly-bought sneakers. Tables topped with board games lined the space, while popcorn and cotton candy was also handed out­ to attendees.

With an environmental and sustainable mindset, the duo has invested heavily in the use of Micro Fiber material, which is also known as “Vegan Leather,” instead of actual leather. They are already known for their recycled rubber soles, a unique calling card for the edgy, homegrown brand.

Reported as the Kingdom’s first major sneaker brand, Al-Tamimi had no idea she would find such success when she started out.

“I had no idea this would become my life today,” Al-Tamimi said in a previous interview. “It’s exciting to be the first Saudi sneaker brand — that’s a milestone in itself.”

The Nou Project was launched with the aim to broaden the way art is consumed and support emerging artists by providing them with a platform to gain recognition — some of their sneakers feature striking and often thought-provoking artwork.

The new designs were created in collaboration with artists Nika Fontaine, Baron Von Fancy and Franz Klainsek who designed each pair with their unique style, ranging from street art to digital image manipulation and pop art.