Ordering in with Lugmety: Zaikaki offers up Indian soul food

Updated 16 May 2019
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Ordering in with Lugmety: Zaikaki offers up Indian soul food

  • The restaurant offers vegetarian and non-vegetarian options
  • The order came with complementary sauces and pickled achar dips

Riyadh: As Ramadan continues, it can get more and more difficult to prepare a home-cooked meal for iftar everyday — especially if you arrive home from work with little time to spare.

I recently caved and ordered in using food delivery app Lugmety because time and energy were in short supply and we needed a hot meal, stat.

After scrolling through the options in my vicinity — the app offers a range of cuisines at a variety of price points — my husband and I settled on Indian food and, with our mouths already watering, selected a few dishes from Zaikaki, which offers both vegetarian and non-vegetarian meals.

Our food arrived with time to spare and the packaging kept everything piping hot.

We especially liked the meat samosas, an Indian puff pastry stuffed with fresh ground lamb meat and potato — it was the perfect start to our meal.

We then moved on to the murgh paneer angar with its marinated boneless chicken breasts in a fragrant pot of yoghurt, red chili and cottage cheese. The dish was extremely juicy, tender and moist.

The butter chicken, cooked in mild spices with a rich tomato-based gravy and crushed cashew nuts, was another winner and we were even able to customize our order on the app, which offers you the ability to choose an option of chicken, beef or prawns.

If you prefer things on the spicy side, the bhuna ghosht is a fiery meat dish with a not-so-subtle kick of character, courtesy of its chilies.

Indian cuisine needs a superb base — be it rice or naan, you cannot spoon down such intense flavors without a delicious plate-to-mouth vehicle as it were.

In my household, a traditional plain biryani is a must. The restaurant’s basmati rice garnished with coriander, spices and nuts pairs perfectly with any curry. And because we were feeling decadent, we topped it all off with a hot butter naan, with just a hint of salt and the ideal crunchy-to-soft ratio.

The restaurant also sent complementary sauces and pickled achar dips, which we mopped up with the naan long after the mains had disappeared.


Bong d’Or: Korean director wins Cannes’ top prize

Updated 10 min 48 sec ago
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Bong d’Or: Korean director wins Cannes’ top prize

  • French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics" wins festival’s second place award, the Grand Prize
  • Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne shared the best director for “Young Ahmed”

CANNES, France: South Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s social satire “Parasite,” about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family, won the Cannes Film Festival’s top award, the Palme d’Or, on Saturday.
The win for “Parasite” marks the first Korean film to ever win the Palme. In the festival’s closing ceremony, jury president Alejandro Inarritu said the choice had been “unanimous” for the nine-person jury.
The genre-mixing film had been celebrated as arguably the most critically acclaimed film at Cannes this year and the best yet from the 49-year-old director of “Snowpiercer” and “Okja.”
It was the second straight Palme victory for an Asian director. Last year, the award went to Japanese filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda’s “Shoplifters.”
Two years ago, Bong was in Cannes’ competition with “Okja,” a movie distributed in North America by Netflix. After it and Noah Baumbach’s “The Meyerowitz Stories” — another Netflix release — premiered in Cannes, the festival ruled that all films in competition needed French theatrical distribution. Netflix has since withdrawn from the festival on the French Riveira.
The festival’s second place award, the Grand Prize, went to French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics.” Diop was the first black female director in competition at Cannes.
Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne shared the best director for “Young Ahmed.”
Best actor went to Antonio Banderas for Pedro Almodovar’s “Pain and Glory,” while best actress was won by British actress Emily Beecham for “Little Joe.”
Although few quibbled with the choice of Bong, some had expected Cannes to make history by giving the Palme to a female filmmaker for just the second time.
Celine Sciamma’s period romance “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” was the Palme pick for many critics this year, but it ended up with best screenplay.
In the festival’s 72-year history, only Jane Champion has won the prize in 1993, and she tied with Chen Kaige’s “Farewell My Concubine.”