Ordering in with Lugmety: Zaikaki offers up Indian soul food

Updated 16 May 2019

Ordering in with Lugmety: Zaikaki offers up Indian soul food

  • The restaurant offers vegetarian and non-vegetarian options
  • The order came with complementary sauces and pickled achar dips

Riyadh: As Ramadan continues, it can get more and more difficult to prepare a home-cooked meal for iftar everyday — especially if you arrive home from work with little time to spare.

I recently caved and ordered in using food delivery app Lugmety because time and energy were in short supply and we needed a hot meal, stat.

After scrolling through the options in my vicinity — the app offers a range of cuisines at a variety of price points — my husband and I settled on Indian food and, with our mouths already watering, selected a few dishes from Zaikaki, which offers both vegetarian and non-vegetarian meals.

Our food arrived with time to spare and the packaging kept everything piping hot.

We especially liked the meat samosas, an Indian puff pastry stuffed with fresh ground lamb meat and potato — it was the perfect start to our meal.

We then moved on to the murgh paneer angar with its marinated boneless chicken breasts in a fragrant pot of yoghurt, red chili and cottage cheese. The dish was extremely juicy, tender and moist.

The butter chicken, cooked in mild spices with a rich tomato-based gravy and crushed cashew nuts, was another winner and we were even able to customize our order on the app, which offers you the ability to choose an option of chicken, beef or prawns.

If you prefer things on the spicy side, the bhuna ghosht is a fiery meat dish with a not-so-subtle kick of character, courtesy of its chilies.

Indian cuisine needs a superb base — be it rice or naan, you cannot spoon down such intense flavors without a delicious plate-to-mouth vehicle as it were.

In my household, a traditional plain biryani is a must. The restaurant’s basmati rice garnished with coriander, spices and nuts pairs perfectly with any curry. And because we were feeling decadent, we topped it all off with a hot butter naan, with just a hint of salt and the ideal crunchy-to-soft ratio.

The restaurant also sent complementary sauces and pickled achar dips, which we mopped up with the naan long after the mains had disappeared.


What We Are Reading Today: All You Can Ever Know by Nicole Chung

Updated 24 min 41 sec ago

What We Are Reading Today: All You Can Ever Know by Nicole Chung

  • From early childhood, she heard the story of her adoption as a comforting, prepackaged myth

What does it mean to lose your roots — within your culture, within your family— and what happens when you find them?

All You Can Ever Know is a profound, moving chronicle of surprising connections and the repercussions of unearthing painful family secrets — vital reading for anyone who has ever struggled to figure out where they belong, according to a review published on goodreads.com

Nicole Chung was born severely premature, placed for adoption by her Korean parents, and raised by a white family in a sheltered Oregon town.

From early childhood, she heard the story of her adoption as a comforting, prepackaged myth.

She believed that her biological parents had made the ultimate sacrifice in the hopes of giving her a better life, that forever feeling slightly out of place was simply her fate as a transracial adoptee. But as she grew up — facing prejudice her adoptive family could not see, finding her identity as an Asian American and a writer, becoming ever more curious about where she came from — she wondered if the story she had been told was the whole truth.

With warmth, candor, and startling insight, Chung tells of her search for the people who gave her up, which coincided with the birth of her own child.