Pope Francis issues new warning against fake news

Pope Francis speaks during a meeting with the members of Italian Foreign Press Association at the Vatican on May 18, 2019. (Vatican Media/­Handout via REUTERS)
Updated 18 May 2019
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Pope Francis issues new warning against fake news

  • Journalists must be very careful of their choice of words in an era of “hostile language” proliferating everywhere, pope says
  • He also asked the press to speak of those "forgotten by society", such as the Rohingyas of Myanmar and the Yazidis of Iraq
VATICAN CITY: Pope Francis on Saturday urged journalists to desist from publishing fake news, saying it could cause harm, and instead “take time to understand” issues before reporting on them.
Receiving foreign journalists in the Vatican, the pontiff also urged journalists to remain “humble” saying humility “prevents the rotten flow of disinformation and offers the good bread of truth.”
Pope Francis said humility was of great importance as it implies consciousness “that through an article, a tweet, a live broadcast either televised or on radio can do good, but also if one is not attentive and scrupulous, harm.”
He also said journalists must be very careful of their choice of words in an era of “hostile language” proliferating everywhere, especially on social media.
“Everyone knows how the search for truth is difficult and demands humility,” he said.
He also asked the press to speak of “wars forgotten by society.
“Who still talks of the Rohingyas?” he said. “Who still speaks of the Yazidis? They are forgotten and they continue to suffer.”
About 740,000 Muslim minority Rohingya have fled Myanmar for Bangladesh since a brutal military crackdown began in August 2017.
Thousands of refugees attempt to flee the Bangladeshi camps each year in pursuit of better opportunities in countries such as Malaysia and Thailand.
They frequently spend their life savings to embark on dangerous boat journeys they believe will improve their lives, but many fall prey to international human trafficking gangs.
The Yazidi community once numbered around 500,000 members in the mountainous Sinjar region of northwest Iraq, but it was ravaged by the Daesh’s 2014 sweep into the area.
Jihadists killed Yazidi men, forced boys to join their ranks as fighters and abducted and imprisoned thousands of Yazidi women as sex slaves.


Google Doodle serves up falafel in quirky animation

Updated 18 June 2019
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Google Doodle serves up falafel in quirky animation

  • It is believed falafels originated in Egypt, where they were called ta’ameya and made of fava beans
  • The popularity of falafel then moved towards the Levant area, where the use of chickpea became a staple

DUBAI: One of the Middle East’s favorite dishes has been featured in a Google Doodle as the site apparently took a break from the Women’s World Cup.

Google had been running a series of doodles about the major sporting event, but on Tuesday – apparently randomly - focused on what the search giant described as the “best thing that ever happened to chickpeas.”

We don’t know why they chose Tuesday to run the Doodle – June 12 having been International Falafel Day.  

But the Middle East’s claim to these mouthwatering balls of chickpeas, onions, herbs and spices is undeniable.

Here's a simple step-by-step guide to making falafels, posted by food blog Food Wishes:

It is believed falafels originated in Egypt, where they were called ta’ameya and made of fava beans, about a thousand years ago, by Coptic Christians who ate them during lent as a meat substitute.

Another version of the story suggests that it goes further back to Pharaonic times – traces of fava beans were said to be found in the tombs of the Pharaohs, according to website Egyptian Streets, and that there were paintings from ancient Egypt showing people making the food.

The popularity of falafel then moved towards the Levant area, where the use of chickpea became a staple.

Over the years, many variations of falafel were invented, with global fast food chain McDonalds joining in the falafel craze with its McFalafel.

Popular Iraqi-American comedian Remy Munasifi, attracted more than 1.5 million views for a song about falafels he posted on his YouTube account “GoRemy.’