Embassy in Ankara warns Saudi investors

A Saudi Arabia flag flies in front of the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on October 13, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 19 May 2019
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Embassy in Ankara warns Saudi investors

  • Cases reported to the embassy include not receiving a title deed or receiving mortgage-restricted titles, “in addition to preventing them (Saudis) from entering their houses

JEDDAH: The Saudi Embassy in Ankara on Friday posted a warning for Saudi real estate investors in Turkey on its official Twitter account.
The embassy said it had received a high number of complaints, some about fraud, from Saudi investors in Turkey’s real estate market.
Saudis wishing to buy property or invest in Turkey are urged to contact the embassy and consulate first to provide them with sufficient details in order to preserve their rights.
Cases reported to the embassy include not receiving a title deed or receiving mortgage-restricted titles, “in addition to preventing them (Saudis) from entering their houses despite paying the full value of the property and receiving threats from construction companies,” the embassy said.
It urged investors to contact the embassy to learn about legal procedures and the credibility of companies operating in the field.
Many saw Turkish real estate as a good opportunity amid the country’s economic turmoil in 2018, dramatic fluctuations in its currency, and recently eased restrictions on foreign buyers.
The number of properties sold to foreigners jumped 87 percent at the start of 2019 compared to the same period last year, according to the Turkish Statistical Institute, TRT English reported in April.
Kate Everett-Allen, head of international residential research at the estate agency Knight Frank, told Arab News that Gulf buyers are mainly from Iraq and Saudi Arabia, with a smaller number from Kuwait and Iran. 


Innovative Saudi cultural center showcases world-famous ‘The Scream’ artist’s exhibition

Updated 48 min 23 sec ago
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Innovative Saudi cultural center showcases world-famous ‘The Scream’ artist’s exhibition

  • 40 works by Edvard Munch go on display for first time in Middle East

DHAHRAN: A dynamic Saudi cultural center is to showcase the works of one of the world’s most famous painters in an exhibition-first for the Middle East.

Forty pieces by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch, best known for his iconic “The Scream” painting, will go on public display at the King Abdul Aziz Center for World Culture (Ithra).

The special exhibition, titled “Landscapes of the Soul,” is the latest in a series of high-profile cultural events to be staged at the showpiece exhibition in Dhahran.

Developed by Saudi Aramco with the aim of stimulating knowledge, creativity and cross-cultural engagement, Ithra’s theater, museum, exhibition hall and art gallery complex forms a key part of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 reform plan to promote culture and entertainment.

The Munch exhibition, which runs until Sept. 3, portrays the artist’s personal life experiences of misery, love, despair, loneliness and reflections of the soul, through his distinctive works.

“It is such an honor to host and introduce to Saudi Arabia, and indeed, the Middle East, the work of the world-renowned artist Edvard Munch,” Rania Biltagi, Ithra’s head of communications and partnership, told Arab News.

Munch’s (1863-1944) original exhibition has been located in Oslo, Norway since 1963, and the Saudi display is being staged in Ithra’s Great Hall in partnership with the Munch Museum in Norway.

As well as a lithograph version of his most famous painting “The Scream,” other works on show will include “Summer Night. The Voice,” 1894, “Self-Portrait,” 1895, and “The Sick Child,” 1896.

“A moment that stood out from the opening was when speaking to a couple visiting the exhibit, they mentioned that they were Norwegian and working in Saudi,” Biltagi said. “They explained that they had never had the chance to visit the Munch Museum in their homeland and what an unexpected pleasure it was to be able to see Munch’s work in Saudi.”

Biltagi added that the event epitomized the aim of Ithra in providing a platform to bring together cultures as well as people.

The center, featured in Time magazine’s list of the world’s top 100 places to visit, is a pioneer on the Kingdom’s culture and arts scene, organizing a variety of events, performances, programs and experiences to suit all ages and backgrounds. Previous exhibitions have included a focus on Saudi contemporary art, Leonardo da Vinci, and installations symbolizing creativity and innovation.