Dubai’s casual Peruvian outpost wants you to feel your food this Ramadan

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LIMA Dubai is located in City Walk. (Instagram)
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LIMA Dubai is offering set iftar menus at $54 per person during Ramadan. (Supplied))
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Lamb Rump Seco. (Supplied)
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San Martin Chocolate. (Supplied)
Updated 21 May 2019

Dubai’s casual Peruvian outpost wants you to feel your food this Ramadan

  • LIMA Dubai is offering set iftar menus at $54 per person during Ramadan
  • It is located at Dubai's City Walk

DUBAI: LIMA Dubai, a casual dining outpost of Peruvian cuisine in Dubai, is offering up a four-course iftar menu throughout the Holy Month featuring gems from the Latin American country.

To begin, we were offered a hearty Peruvian Aguadito Soup, with a chicken breast and potatoes steeped in a creamy blend of coriander and corn. Although the potatoes were rather underdone, the soup was flavorful, yet gentle — the perfect opener.

Next up was a pair of refreshing appetizers — a Salmon Tiradito and a Solterito Salad. The ceviche-style salmon with tiger’s milk was a tad bland, with the usually tangy Peruvian dressing failing to hit the right note. The salad, however, was a different story. Crunchy, deep-fried strips of beetroot were sprinkled over a springy, fresh mix of rocket leaves and olives, all dressed in a tantalizingly tangy Japanese mayonnaise dressing. Tiny pops of sweetcorn and soft chips of halloumi cheese offered up a mixture of textures in one of my favorite dishes of the night.

And on that note, the mains were served up and I discovered another gem — the Lamb Seco.

Unbelievably tender, the lamb slices were served atop a thick coriander-based sauce, with a pumpkin puree on the side, and were topped with crunchy swirls of slivered, fried pumpkin.

The Baby Chicken was served grilled after being marinated in a glaze of panka chili, which was also offered on the side as a pouring sauce. The fragrant chicken, which was slightly salty for my taste, was dished up on a bed of herbs in a clay case alongside a slightly-too-gloopy cassava puree with hunks of chorizo buried within.

Our colorful table was completed with a side dish of Tacu Tacu Lentils, a puree of pulses, rice and chilies topped with sharp, pickled red onions.

Textures played a big role in the carefully thought out menu and the dessert carried on with that theme.

A rich dark chocolate mousse with white chocolate ice cream and gritty, delicious chocolate soil  was one of the stars of the meal. For a quirky edge, discs of dark chocolate jelly adorned the plate to provide yet another textural element. The decision to pare down the competing flavors offered us the chance to feel the food and appreciate the crunch of the dark crumbs against a creamy, cold lick of ice cream.

LIMA Dubai is offering set iftar menus at $54 per person during Ramadan.


What We Are Reading Today: Digital Minimalism by Cal Newport

Updated 23 August 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Digital Minimalism by Cal Newport

  • Digital minimalists are all around us

Minimalism is the art of knowing how much is just enough. Digital minimalism applies this idea to our personal technology. It is the key to living a focused life in an increasingly noisy world.

In this timely and enlightening book, the bestselling author of Deep Work introduces a philosophy for technology use that has already improved countless lives, according to a preview published on goodreads.com.

Digital minimalists are all around us. They are the calm, happy people who can hold long conversations without furtive glances at their phones. They can get lost in a good book, a woodworking project, or a leisurely morning run. They can have fun with friends and family without the obsessive urge to document the experience.

Drawing on a diverse array of real-life examples, from Amish farmers to harried parents to Silicon Valley programmers, Newport identifies the common practices of digital minimalists and the ideas that underpin them. 

He shows how digital minimalists are rethinking their relationship to social media, rediscovering the pleasures of the offline world, and reconnecting with their inner selves through regular periods of solitude.

He then shares strategies for integrating these practices into your life, starting with a 30-day “digital declutter” process that has already helped thousands feel less overwhelmed and more in control.