Trump sets $8bn-plus in arms sales to Saudi Arabia and UAE

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In this file photo, Iranian-made missiles are seen next to a portrait of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei at a war exhibition held by Iran's revolutionary guard at Baharestan square near the Iranian Parliament. (Reuters)
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Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei speaks to a group of students in Tehran on May 22, 2019. (Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader via AP)
Updated 26 May 2019
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Trump sets $8bn-plus in arms sales to Saudi Arabia and UAE

  • Pompeo says US partners in Mideast need contracts to be completed to help deter Iran
  • Trump’s administration also announced that it was sending 1,500 additional troops to the Middle East

WASHINGTON: US President Donald Trump, declaring a national emergency because of tensions with Iran, has swept aside objections from Congress to complete the sale of over $8 billion of weapons to Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Jordan.

The Trump administration informed congressional committees that it will go ahead with 22 military sales to the Saudi Arabia, UAE and Jordan, infuriating lawmakers by circumventing a long-standing precedent for congressional review of major weapons sales.

Members of Congress had been blocking sales of offensive military equipment to Saudi Arabia and the UAE for months.

Several of Trump’s fellow Republicans, as well as Democrats, said they would object to such a plan, fearing that blowing through the “holds” process would eliminate Congress’ ability to check not just Trump but future presidents from selling weapons where they liked.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in a statement that US partners in the Middle East needed the contracts to be completed to help deter Iran, and that the decision to circumvent Congress was meant to be a “one-time event.”

In documents sent to Congress, Pompeo listed a wide range of products and services that would be provided to the countries. These include Raytheon precision-guided munitions (PGMs), support for Boeing Co. F-15 aircraft, and Javelin anti-tank missiles, which are made by Raytheon and Lockheed Martin Corp. 

Iranian malign activity poses a fundamental threat to the stability of the Middle East and to American security at home and abroad. Mike Pompeo

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo

Other companies that will benefit include General Electric, now cleared to sell engines for use in F-16 fighter jets operated by the UAE, and the US unit of French firm Thales, which was cleared to sell a fuzing system for Paveway IV precision-guided bombs to Britain and the UAE.

It will also likely be welcome news for Britain’s BAE Systems Plc and Europe’s Airbus, clearing the way for installation of Paveway laser-guided bombs on European-built Eurofighter and Tornado fighter jets sold to Saudi Arabia, as well F-15 fighters built by Boeing.

In his memorandum justifying the emergency declaration, Pompeo listed years of actions by Iran. “Iranian malign activity poses a fundamental threat to the stability of the Middle East and to American security at home and abroad,” he wrote and cited “a number of troubling and escalatory indications and warnings” from Tehran.

Trump’s administration also announced that it was sending 1,500 additional troops to the Middle East, which it described as an effort to bolster defenses against Iran over what it sees as a threat of potential attack.

Members of Congress from both parties have worried that Trump is pushing toward war with Iran. Clarke Cooper, assistant secretary of state for political-military affairs, said the administration was responding to important needs from partners.

“This is about deterrence and it’s not about war,” he told Reuters in a telephone interview.


China ‘harvesting’ Falun Gong organs: report

Updated 18 June 2019
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China ‘harvesting’ Falun Gong organs: report

  • The panel said a considerable amount of people were affected by the forced organ collection
  • The report said the waiting time for organ transplants is considerably short
LONDON: Forced organ harvesting has been carried out “for years throughout China” and members of the Falun Gong spiritual group have “probably” been the main victims, according to a panel of lawyers.
A report by the London-based China Tribunal, released to journalists ahead of a summary to be published online on Wednesday, concluded that “forced organ harvesting continues till today.”
The panel said it was “unanimously, and sure beyond reasonable doubt — that in China forced organ harvesting from prisoners of conscience has been practiced for a substantial period of time involving a very substantial number of victims.”
“Falun Gong practitioners have been one — and probably the main — source of organ supply,” it added.
The China Tribunal was set up by campaign group the “International Coalition to End Transplant Abuse in China” to examine the issue.
The panel, headed by British lawyer Geoffrey Nice, warned that the “concerted persecution and medical testing” of China’s Muslim Uighurs meant “evidence of forced organ harvesting of this group may emerge in due course.”
The report cited “extraordinarily short waiting times” for organs and the number of transplant operations performed as evidence, highlighting the “impossibility of there being anything like sufficient ‘eligible donors’.”
China has repeatedly denied accusations that it takes organs from prisoners of conscience.
A government spokesman issued a statement before the report’s release saying “we hope that the British people will not be misled by rumors.”