Bambah’s Ramadan 2019 edit is pastel perfection

Full coverage fabric, high necklines and wonderfully detailed sleeves mark the collection. (Supplied)
Updated 26 May 2019
0

Bambah’s Ramadan 2019 edit is pastel perfection

  • The new collection sports a lot of pastel colors and gold embellishments
  • The prices range between $430 to $790

DUBAI: Egyptian designer Maha Abdul Rasheed, founder of the fashion label Bambah, is showing off a summery new line this Ramadan.

The Ramadan 2019 collection is making waves this season with its laid back, pretty pastel take on the traditional kaftan.

Mint green color blocked stripes on cream and gold-flecked embellishments on lilac, the collection’s colors are light and refreshing.

(Supplied) 

Luxurious jacquard with gold-flecked floral detailing add sheen to largely pastel bases, while the ruffled sleeves on the Isabella Kaftan are a welcome structural update on the traditional flowing silhouette of the robe.

While florals and gilded materials litter the Ramadan 2019 collection, there are a few options that are fresher and more urban. Rasheed makes good use of thick stripes in a few of the available kaftans, offering up combinations in a sorbet-like color palette of peach, green and cream.

Modest, full coverage fabric, high necklines and long, wonderfully detailed sleeves mark the collection — making it ideal for the Holy Month, as well as for your sartorial needs this Eid Al-Fitr.

(Supplied) 

Prices range from $430 to $790, with many of the designs hovering around the $500 mark.

Rasheed initially opened Bambah as a stand-alone boutique in Dubai, selling a carefully curated selection of vintage pieces. While the concept of one-of-a-kind, pre-owned fashion was almost entirely new to the region at that time, Rasheed persevered, educating fashionable Emiratis about the kind of couture one can’t find in malls.

Vintage Valentino blazers and Dior dresses flew off the shelves and before long, the boutique became a hub for Dubai-based fashion influencers looking to add unique character to their wardrobes.

(Supplied)

After noticing that her clients were drawn to the hyper-feminine princess skirts and sweet-heart necklines popular in the 1950s and 1960s, Rasheed began designing herself. In a few short years, the company has expanded widely, with a loyal, cross-continental client base.

Today, global A-listers known for their refined, high glam-style like Amal Clooney and Priyanka Chopra have donned Rasheed’s designs.


What happened to the Apollo goodwill moon rocks?

Updated 16 June 2019
0

What happened to the Apollo goodwill moon rocks?

  • Some of the gifts have either gone missing, were stolen or destroyed over the decades

HOUSTON, Texas: US President Richard Nixon gave moon rocks collected by Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 astronauts to 135 countries around the world and the 50 US states as a token of American goodwill.
While some hold pride of place in museums and scientific institutions, many others are unaccounted for — they have either gone missing, were stolen or even destroyed over the decades.
The list below recounts the stories of some of the missing moon rocks and others that were lost and later found.
It is compiled from research done by Joseph Gutheinz Jr, a retired NASA special agent known as the “Moon Rock Hunter,” his students, and collectSPACE, a website which specializes in space history.

• Both the Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 moon rocks presented to perpetually war-wracked Afghanistan have vanished.

• One of the moon rocks destined for Cyprus was never delivered due to the July 1974 Turkish invasion of the island and the assassination of the US ambassador the following month.
It was given to NASA years later by the son of a US diplomat but has not been handed over to Cyprus.

Joseph Gutheinz, an attorney known as the "Moon Rock Hunter," displays meteorite fragments in his office on May 22, 2019 in Friendswood, Texas. (AFP / Loren Elliot)



• Honduras’s Apollo 17 moon rock was recovered by Gutheinz and Bob Cregger, a US Postal Service agent, in a 1998 undercover sting operation baptized “Operation Lunar Eclipse.”
It had been sold to a Florida businessman, Alan Rosen, for $50,000 by a Honduran army colonel. Rosen tried to sell the rock to Gutheinz for $5 million. It was seized and eventually returned to Honduras.

• Ireland’s Apollo 11 moon rock was on display in Dublin’s Dunsink Observatory, which was destroyed in a 1977 fire. Debris from the observatory — including the moon rock — ended up in the Finglas landfill.

• The Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 moon rocks given to then Libyan leader Col. Muammar Qaddafi have vanished.

• Malta’s Apollo 17 moon rock was stolen from a museum in May 2004. It has not been found.

• Nicaragua’s Apollo 17 moon rock was allegedly sold to someone in the Middle East for $5-10 million. Its Apollo 11 moon rock ended up with a Las Vegas casino owner, who displayed it for a time in his Moon Rock Cafe. Bob Stupak’s estate turned it over to NASA when he died. It has since been returned to Nicaragua.

• Romania’s Apollo 11 moon rock is on display in a museum in Bucharest. Romania’s Apollo 17 moon rock is believed to have been sold by the estate of former dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, who was executed along with his wife, Elena, on Christmas Day 1989.


Spain’s Apollo 17 moon rock is on display in Madrid’s Naval Museum after being donated by the family of Admiral Luis Carrero Blanco, who was assassinated by the Basque separatist group ETA in 1973.
Spain’s Apollo 11 moon rock is missing and is believed to be in the hands of the family of former dictator Francisco Franco.
cl/sst