Bangladesh PM arrives for Makkah summit

Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina arrives in Jeddah on Friday. (SPA)
Updated 01 June 2019
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Bangladesh PM arrives for Makkah summit

MAKKAH: The prime minister of Bangladesh, Sheikh Hasina, arrived in Saudi Arabia on Friday to attend the 14th Organization of Islamic Cooperation summit, titled “Makkah Summit: Hand in Hand Toward the Future,” held in the holy city.

Sheikh Hasina was greeted at King Abdul Aziz International Airport by Prince Badr bin Sultan bin Abdul Aziz, deputy governor of Makkah.

Other leaders who have arrived in the Kingdom for the summit include Bahrain’s King Hamad bin Isa Al-Khalifa, Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri, Kuwaiti Emir Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi, Azerbaijani Prime Minister Novruz Mammadov, Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan, Qatari Prime Minister Sheikh Abdullah bin Nasser bin Khalifa Al-Thani, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and Iraqi President Barham Salih.

Earlier, the Gulf and Arab League emergency summits in Makkah denounced Iranian actions in the Gulf as destabilizing regional security, and urged the International community to take “strict measures” against Tehran.


Christchurch Muslims praise King Salman’s Hajj offer

Updated 19 July 2019
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Christchurch Muslims praise King Salman’s Hajj offer

  • The president of the Muslim Association of Canterbury Shagaf Khan said people will be both financially and spiritually supported during the journey
  • Khan said a trip to Makkah would normally cost around 10,000 New Zealand dollars ($6,769), but King Salman’s offer would cover pilgrims “from the time they leave their house and come back”

CHRISTCHURCH: King Salman’s Hajj offer to host families of those affected by March’s Christchurch terror attacks is “something really special,” said the president of the Muslim Association of Canterbury, Shagaf Khan.
The Saudi king has offered to host and cover the expenses of 200 Hajj pilgrims when they journey to Makkah this year.
Khan said people will be both financially and spiritually supported during the journey. “For some of them, it’ll be a great comfort feeling like they’ve fulfilled the obligations of being a Muslim,” he added.
Khan said a trip to Makkah would normally cost around 10,000 New Zealand dollars ($6,769), but King Salman’s offer would cover pilgrims “from the time they leave their house and come back.”
When asked what the offer would mean for Canterbury’s Muslim community, Khan said it is part of the solidarity and support that has been shown to them since the Christchurch terror attacks, which claimed the lives of 51 people.
“Four months on … people still feel supported and they feel they’re still being remembered,” he added.
Sheikh Mohammed Amir, who is working closely with the local community, Saudi Arabia’s Embassy and its Ministry of Islamic Affairs to implement King Salman’s offer, said it will be available for those who had lost family members or been injured in the mosque attacks.
Canterbury’s Muslims are “very appreciative” of the offer, added Amir, who is chairman of the Islamic Scholars Board of New Zealand.
“I’ll say with full confidence that this will be a big relief for the deceased’s families, for the victims, for all those who’ve been injured and affected,” he said.
When asked how the organization of the pilgrimage is going, Amir said “so far, so good,” but added that it has been challenging without official records to track everyone down.
He said it is an honor and a responsibility to help organize the pilgrimage, which he has been helping to plan since the end of Ramadan. “People are very excited about it,” he added.
He said he believed that the king’s offer had been made to help people’s rehabilitation after the terror attacks.
“The community believes he’s going to contribute in building Christchurch and bringing people to a normal life,” Amir added.