Dubai-based label Beige is all about timeless elegance

Dubai-based womenswear label Beige is offering up a sophisticated Spring/Summer 2019 collection. (Supplied/Instagram)
Updated 01 June 2019
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Dubai-based label Beige is all about timeless elegance

  • The sophisticated line features oversized, puffed silhouettes
  • Launched in 2017 by Emirati designer Muna Al-Othaiman, Beige outfits have been spotted on runways around the world

DUBAI: Dubai-based womenswear label Beige has unveiled a Spring/Summer 2019 collection full of statement-making sartorial glamor.

The sophisticated line features oversized, puffed silhouettes and is based on a demure color palette of creams and various shades of green, with a pale mauve and steel blue also making an appearance.

Launched in 2017 by Emirati designer Muna Al-Othaiman, Beige outfits have been spotted on runways around the world, including a showcase at London Modest Fashion Week in 2018.

At the time, the designer was featured in the Emerging Design Talent category, but she has gone on to make quite a name for herself in the UAE.

The Esmod graduate spoke to Harper’s Bazaar Arabia last year and shared more about the beginnings of the brand.

“I love casualwear with a couture element, but could never really find anything on the market that suited my personal style, so I decided to create Beige,” she told the magazine.

She also revealed the sort of woman she is looking to dress in her unique pieces.

“The Beige woman is feminine, educated and worldly. She invests in timeless pieces which elevate her wardrobe and never compromises on quality. She is a trendsetter with her effortless and confident style,” Al-Othaiman said.

Her silhouettes are forgiving and graceful, with A-line cuts and poufy sleeves found dotted across the new collection.

Embellishments are used sparingly, but the designer does have a penchant for silk buttons, which can be found on fitted sleeves throughout the line and are reminiscent of the hooked buttons found on many wedding dresses.

Rouched collars and embossed prints of twisting leaves can also be found in the new line, which is refreshingly understated.

From structured, cream-colored options to tulle creations in black — with frilled borders, lace and dotted tulle combined together to create a delicate mix-and-match ensemble — the designer offers up a variety of choices.

Each piece fits into the collection, there’s nothing jarring about any of the outfits despite subtle shifts in shade and style.

Although some fashion-lovers do prefer a tighter cut, with more cinched in waists and figure-hugging options, this collection is all about the beauty of the fabric and the off-beat colors, making it the perfect option to stand out for all the right reasons this Eid Al-Fitr.


What happened to the Apollo goodwill moon rocks?

Updated 16 min 43 sec ago
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What happened to the Apollo goodwill moon rocks?

  • Some of the gifts have either gone missing, were stolen or destroyed over the decades

HOUSTON, Texas: US President Richard Nixon gave moon rocks collected by Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 astronauts to 135 countries around the world and the 50 US states as a token of American goodwill.
While some hold pride of place in museums and scientific institutions, many others are unaccounted for — they have either gone missing, were stolen or even destroyed over the decades.
The list below recounts the stories of some of the missing moon rocks and others that were lost and later found.
It is compiled from research done by Joseph Gutheinz Jr, a retired NASA special agent known as the “Moon Rock Hunter,” his students, and collectSPACE, a website which specializes in space history.

• Both the Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 moon rocks presented to perpetually war-wracked Afghanistan have vanished.

• One of the moon rocks destined for Cyprus was never delivered due to the July 1974 Turkish invasion of the island and the assassination of the US ambassador the following month.
It was given to NASA years later by the son of a US diplomat but has not been handed over to Cyprus.

Joseph Gutheinz, an attorney known as the "Moon Rock Hunter," displays meteorite fragments in his office on May 22, 2019 in Friendswood, Texas. (AFP / Loren Elliot)



• Honduras’s Apollo 17 moon rock was recovered by Gutheinz and Bob Cregger, a US Postal Service agent, in a 1998 undercover sting operation baptized “Operation Lunar Eclipse.”
It had been sold to a Florida businessman, Alan Rosen, for $50,000 by a Honduran army colonel. Rosen tried to sell the rock to Gutheinz for $5 million. It was seized and eventually returned to Honduras.

• Ireland’s Apollo 11 moon rock was on display in Dublin’s Dunsink Observatory, which was destroyed in a 1977 fire. Debris from the observatory — including the moon rock — ended up in the Finglas landfill.

• The Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 moon rocks given to then Libyan leader Col. Muammar Qaddafi have vanished.

• Malta’s Apollo 17 moon rock was stolen from a museum in May 2004. It has not been found.

• Nicaragua’s Apollo 17 moon rock was allegedly sold to someone in the Middle East for $5-10 million. Its Apollo 11 moon rock ended up with a Las Vegas casino owner, who displayed it for a time in his Moon Rock Cafe. Bob Stupak’s estate turned it over to NASA when he died. It has since been returned to Nicaragua.

• Romania’s Apollo 11 moon rock is on display in a museum in Bucharest. Romania’s Apollo 17 moon rock is believed to have been sold by the estate of former dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, who was executed along with his wife, Elena, on Christmas Day 1989.


Spain’s Apollo 17 moon rock is on display in Madrid’s Naval Museum after being donated by the family of Admiral Luis Carrero Blanco, who was assassinated by the Basque separatist group ETA in 1973.
Spain’s Apollo 11 moon rock is missing and is believed to be in the hands of the family of former dictator Francisco Franco.
cl/sst