The Daily: A cozy iftar for the family

The buffet had a variety of dishes, mostly from Arabic cuisines. (Supplied)
Updated 02 June 2019

The Daily: A cozy iftar for the family

  • The desserts were the best part of the Daily's buffet
  • The restaurant gives out vouchers for free iftars to be shared

DUBAI: For a warm and cozy iftar, head to the buffet at the Daily in any of the Roves across Dubai.

The branch at Trade Center has a variety of starters and sweets, most of the options from Arabic cuisines.

The lentil soup was delicious, combining the right amount of spices for a perfect flavor. One of my favorite starters was their tabbouleh, a parsley salad with burghul and tomatoes.

There was also variety of main dishes, such as couscous, samaka harra and chicken biryani. The samaka harra was delicious, coated in a tomato and chili sauce while remaining juicy inside.

However, the desserts were the most notable part of this iftar.

The Umm Ali, which is similar to bread pudding, was creamy with just the right amount of sweetness. Another Arabic dessert, Halawet Jubn, or Arabic cream rolled in a cheese dough, transported me right back to when I used to eat it in Syria. Coffee and tea are also offered at the buffet.

For this Ramadan, the Daily is giving a free iftar coupons for every purchased meal, to highlight and support the spirit of giving the holy month is famed for. Guests in turn are welcome to share their coupons with their friends, or even strangers.

The staff were attentive and friendly, and the ambience was welcoming. There is an enjoyable outdoor terrace, where visitors can enjoy pleasant weather, but the indoor space can get a little cramped.

The buffet is priced at $27 per person, and the Rove has various locations across Dubai, including Downtown, the Trade Center and the Marina.


What We Are Reading Today: Democratic Equality by James Lindley Wilson

Updated 17 August 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Democratic Equality by James Lindley Wilson

  • It mounts a bold and persuasive defense of democracy as a way of making collective decisions

Democracy establishes relationships of political equality, ones in which citizens equally share authority over what they do together and respect one another as equals. 

But in today’s divided public square, democracy is challenged by political thinkers who disagree about how democratic institutions should be organized, and by antidemocratic politicians who exploit uncertainties about what democracy requires and why it matters. 

Democratic Equality mounts a bold and persuasive defense of democracy as a way of making collective decisions, showing how equality of authority is essential to relating equally as citizens, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

James Lindley Wilson explains why the US Senate and Electoral College are urgently in need of reform, why proportional representation is not a universal requirement of democracy, how to identify racial vote dilution and gerrymandering in electoral districting, how to respond to threats to democracy posed by wealth inequality, and how judicial review could be more compatible with the democratic ideal.