A Super ShowDown with the stars: A young WWE super fan’s dream comes true

Nassir Al-Khlaiwi, right, in a light mood. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 07 June 2019

A Super ShowDown with the stars: A young WWE super fan’s dream comes true

  • Super fan Nassir took a road trip with his father Faisal and younger brother Abdullah from Riyadh to attend the event

JEDDAH: Various activities are taking place in Saudi Arabia to celebrate Eid Al-Fitr, among them the World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Super ShowDown in Jeddah on June 7-8. 

The event is hosted by the General Sports Authority (GSA) at King Abdullah Sports City Stadium.

Nassir Al-Khlaiwi, 18, a WWE super fan with special needs, took a road trip with his father Faisal and younger brother Abdullah from Riyadh to attend the event. 

Abdullah came up with the idea as a gift to Nassir, who said he has watched every WWE program for the last eight years. 




Nassir with a replica belt. (Photo/Supplied)

“Out of all the shows, I like the Royal Rumble the best because it has lots of people in the ring (at the same time),” Nassir told Arab News. 

“I’m excited to watch the matches live for the first time, and I’m looking forward to watching Roman Reigns in action the most.”

Faisal said: “It’s a good opportunity to spend quality time with my kids during Eid. To have them watch the Super ShowDown live is an added bonus.”

Abdullah said he is looking forward to watching The Undertaker take on Goldberg. Both brothers said they are looking forward to the Battle Royal, which increased the number of participants from 30 to 50 for the first time in its history in Jeddah in April 2018.

The WWE’s latest event in the Kingdom will include Triple H, Kofi Kingston, Dolph Ziggler, Golberg, The Undertaker, and Saudi Arabia’s own Mansour Al-Shehail.


Dubai uses extreme cold cryotherapy to treat racehorses in world first

Updated 21 August 2019

Dubai uses extreme cold cryotherapy to treat racehorses in world first

  • Cryotherapy, which surrounds the body in a mist as cold as -140°C, has been used for decades on athletes to aid recovery and in medicine
  • A Dubai-based company, Revive Cryotherapy, says it is now offering the first whole body cryotherapy chamber for horses

DUBAI: In the searing summer heat of Dubai, some of the world’s top racehorses are being swathed in freezing nitrogen mist to boost their performance.
Cryotherapy, which surrounds the body in a mist as cold as -140°C, has been used for decades on athletes to aid recovery and in medicine. A Dubai-based company, Revive Cryotherapy, says it is now offering the first whole body cryotherapy chamber for horses.
“As far as recovery goes we are learning, but it is positive so far,” said Satish Seemar, head trainer at Zabeel Racing Stables which trains about 125 horses.
“The horses start hopping quicker after their hard work and racing than without cryotherapy,” he added.
Dubai, part of the United Arab Emirates, is known for its connections to elite horse racing. Its ruler, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum, is an avid sponsor, owner and rider of horses. The emirate gives out multi-million dollar prizes at prestigious competitions.
“Horse racing is a big business with prizes worth millions of dollars. With cryotherapy we have seen that you can train harder, recover quicker and you can race more often,” said Luka Jurkovic, general manager of Revive Cryotherapy.
The company also offers the technology to humans and dogs and is thinking of expanding into the world of camel racing.
“We will have to scale it up a bit as camels are obviously bigger,” Jurkovic said.
Revive, which has two other bespoke horse cryotherapy cabins in Dubai, finished the testing phase in April and is now using it daily on horses at Zabeel Stables, a lush green space in the heart of Dubai’s high-rise financial district.
The horses are gradually introduced to the cabin, which fits snugly around their bodies leaving their heads and necks free, and treated with the swirling cold mist. After a first few familiarization sessions, they undergo a full treatment which lasts around seven minutes and cools their skin to about 3-5 degrees.
The cabin doors are not locked allowing horses to escape if they panic.
Cryotherapy is thought to help inflammation and tissue damage, and to help athletes — and horses — recover faster after exercise.