President George Weah in talks offer to Liberian protesters

Revered in Liberia and beyond for blazing a trail for African footballers in Europe, George Weah is struggling to revive a country that is one of the poorest in the world. (AP Photo)
Updated 11 June 2019

President George Weah in talks offer to Liberian protesters

  • Weah, 52, is now being challenged over the same issues on which he campaigned in his rise to the presidency of the West African state just 18 months ago
  • Weah acknowledged that the economy is still facing challenges, stressing that his government had inherited a broken economy

MONROVIA: Liberian President George Weah on Tuesday invited opponents to “round table” talks to seek solutions to the country’s economic woes, four days after thousands protested against rising prices and corruption.
Weah made his offer to “leaders of political parties, civil society groups, elders, religious leaders, our traditional leaders, student leaders and the business community,” in a speech aired on national radio.
He suggested “a round table discussion to afford them the opportunity to present their alternative views, or their suggestions on the economy.”
A protest coalition on Sunday gave Weah a string of demands with a four-week deadline.
They include improvements in areas such as human rights and corruption, as well as the prosecution of Finance Minister Samuel Tweah and Central Bank Governor Nathaniel Patray in connection with financial problems at the Central Bank of Liberia which led to price hikes.
The coalition also called for Weah and all of his officials to declare their assets.
Revered in Liberia and beyond for blazing a trail for African footballers in Europe, Weah is struggling to revive a country that is one of the poorest in the world and still traumatized by back-to-back civil wars between 1989 and 2003 that claimed a quarter of a million lives.
Weah, 52, is now being challenged over the same issues on which he campaigned in his rise to the presidency of the West African state just 18 months ago.
In his radio address the Liberian president appealed to all citizens: “Let us sit and dialogue on the way forward. Bring your ideas to the table and I assure you that they will be given my most careful consideration.”
He acknowledged that the economy is still facing challenges, stressing that his government had inherited a broken economy.
Addressing last Friday’s peaceful protest, Weah said that “some of our citizens have exercised their constitutional rights to publicly assemble with the objective to petition their government. We commend them for the peaceful and orderly manner in which they exercised their rights.”


British airports to introduce 3D screening for carry-on bags

UK Border control is seen in Terminal 2 at Heathrow Airport in London June 4, 2014. (REUTERS)
Updated 2 min 37 sec ago

British airports to introduce 3D screening for carry-on bags

  • The screeners already are being used in trials at London’s Heathrow Airport and they will progressively be rolled out to other British airports by Dec. 1, 2022, the government said

LONDON: Putting small containers of liquids in plastic bags could soon be a thing of the past for airline passengers in Britain after the government announced plans Sunday to introduce 3D screening equipment for carry-on luggage at all major airports.
Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said in a statement that the new technology will improve security and could also mean “an end to passengers having to use plastic bags or rationing what they take away with them.”
Under current security restrictions, passengers are not allowed containers carrying more than 100 milliliters (3.38 fluid ounces) of liquids in their carry-on luggage and the containers have to be in a clear plastic bag.
That could come to an end under the new screening regime and passengers may also be able to keep electrical equipment such as their laptops in their cabin bags.
The screeners already are being used in trials at London’s Heathrow Airport and they will progressively be rolled out to other British airports by Dec. 1, 2022, the government said.
Heathrow CEO John Holland Kaye says the technology “will transform the passenger experience, making air travel simple, streamlined and more secure through the UK’s only hub airport.”