Roord heads late Dutch winner to beat brave Kiwis

Netherlands' midfielder Jill Roord. (AFP)
Updated 14 June 2019

Roord heads late Dutch winner to beat brave Kiwis

LE HAVRE: Jill Roord came off the bench and headed home from close range in added time on Tuesday to give the Netherlands a 1-0 women's World Cup victory over New Zealand in Le Havre.

The victory lifts the European champions into a tie with Canada atop Group E.

“I think we can play better than we did today. But we were looking for a win and New Zealand were looking for a draw, and I'm very glad we finally got what we wanted,” said Dutch coach Sarina Wiegman. “I'm very relieved, of course.”

The Football Ferns, stout in defense and sharp on the counter attack, were left with nothing but disappointment.

“The players will be absolutely devastated but we're a resilient group and I'm pretty confident we'll bounce back,” said New Zealand coach Tom Sermanni.

The stars of a lively match were the two goalkeepers, Sari van Veenendaal for the Netherlands and New Zealand's Erin Nayler. Both were busy and both, at different stages, underwent on-field treatment after brave saves.

The Dutch had almost 70 percent of possession and almost three times as many goal attempts but New Zealand went painfully close three times.

“The Dutch were the dominant team but we created some great chances,” said Sermanni.

In the first half, Olivia Chance hit the bar and Rosie White drew a sprawling save from Van Veenendaal with a long-range strike.

Early in the second half Sarah Gregorius, who is of Dutch descent, shinned a volley into the ground that gave Van Veenendaal time to lunge to her right and claw the ball round the post.

At the other end, center-backs Rebekah Stott and Abby Erceg coped well with the physical presence of Dutch forward Vivianne Miedema and the lively skills of the attackers around her.

When the Dutch did carve a clear chance, they were frustrated either by Nayler or some anxious finishing, until the final moments.

“We found it tough to create openings,” said FIFA's player of the match Lieke Martens. “New Zealand defended well and it was not our best match, that's clear.”

The Dutch swung one more hanging cross to the far post where Lineth Beerensteyn bullied Ali Riley into a tame header back across the goal and Arsenal's Roord guided the ball past the advancing Nayler.

“We can't go away from the game saying we have regrets, we have disappointment,” said Sermanni, who has coached four of the nations in this year's World Cup. “We've got to look at the positive things we did.”


Dubai uses extreme cold cryotherapy to treat racehorses in world first

Updated 21 August 2019

Dubai uses extreme cold cryotherapy to treat racehorses in world first

  • Cryotherapy, which surrounds the body in a mist as cold as -140°C, has been used for decades on athletes to aid recovery and in medicine
  • A Dubai-based company, Revive Cryotherapy, says it is now offering the first whole body cryotherapy chamber for horses

DUBAI: In the searing summer heat of Dubai, some of the world’s top racehorses are being swathed in freezing nitrogen mist to boost their performance.
Cryotherapy, which surrounds the body in a mist as cold as -140°C, has been used for decades on athletes to aid recovery and in medicine. A Dubai-based company, Revive Cryotherapy, says it is now offering the first whole body cryotherapy chamber for horses.
“As far as recovery goes we are learning, but it is positive so far,” said Satish Seemar, head trainer at Zabeel Racing Stables which trains about 125 horses.
“The horses start hopping quicker after their hard work and racing than without cryotherapy,” he added.
Dubai, part of the United Arab Emirates, is known for its connections to elite horse racing. Its ruler, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum, is an avid sponsor, owner and rider of horses. The emirate gives out multi-million dollar prizes at prestigious competitions.
“Horse racing is a big business with prizes worth millions of dollars. With cryotherapy we have seen that you can train harder, recover quicker and you can race more often,” said Luka Jurkovic, general manager of Revive Cryotherapy.
The company also offers the technology to humans and dogs and is thinking of expanding into the world of camel racing.
“We will have to scale it up a bit as camels are obviously bigger,” Jurkovic said.
Revive, which has two other bespoke horse cryotherapy cabins in Dubai, finished the testing phase in April and is now using it daily on horses at Zabeel Stables, a lush green space in the heart of Dubai’s high-rise financial district.
The horses are gradually introduced to the cabin, which fits snugly around their bodies leaving their heads and necks free, and treated with the swirling cold mist. After a first few familiarization sessions, they undergo a full treatment which lasts around seven minutes and cools their skin to about 3-5 degrees.
The cabin doors are not locked allowing horses to escape if they panic.
Cryotherapy is thought to help inflammation and tissue damage, and to help athletes — and horses — recover faster after exercise.