Tunisia, Algeria, Egypt call for a cease-fire in Libya

Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry, left, and his Algerian counterpart Sabri Boukadoum, 2nd left, attend a meeting in Tunis, Tunisia, Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (AP)
Updated 13 June 2019
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Tunisia, Algeria, Egypt call for a cease-fire in Libya

  • They agreed to strengthen their cooperation in the fight against terrorism in the region
  • Libya was plunged into chaos following the 2011 uprising

TUNIS: Tunisia, Algeria and Egypt have expressed their “deep concern” over the chaotic situation in Libya and called for an immediate cease-fire in the country.
The foreign affairs ministers of the three countries, all neighboring Libya, held a meeting on Wednesday in Tunisia’s capital Tunis.
In a statement released overnight, they denounced “the continuous flow of weapons” and the “influx of foreign terrorist fighters” in Libya.
They agreed to strengthen their cooperation in the fight against terrorism in the region.
Earlier this week, the UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres urged all countries to implement an arms embargo against Libya, saying illegal weapons transfers by land, sea and air are fueling the fighting in the oil-rich country.
Libya was plunged into chaos following the 2011 uprising that ousted and killed Muammar Qaddafi.


Stena Impero operator says tanker’s crew safe and well

Updated 54 min 51 sec ago
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Stena Impero operator says tanker’s crew safe and well

  • ‘... they’re all okay and in good health and they’re getting good cooperation with the Iranians on board the vessel’

STOCKHOLM: All 23 crew on a British-flagged tanker seized last week by Iran in the Strait of Hormuz are safe and well, the vessel’s Swedish operator Stena Bulk said on Wednesday after speaking to them.

Iran said on Saturday it had seized the Stena Impero because it had collided with a fishing boat. Stena Bulk has said it has received no evidence of such a collision.

“We had direct contact with the crew on board the vessel last night by telephone and they’re all okay and in good health and they’re getting good cooperation with the Iranians on board,” the firm’s spokesman Pat Adamson said.

Its CEO Erik Hanell said he hoped Tuesday’s contact was “a first sign that we will soon see more positive progress from the Iranian authorities.”

Britain described the seizure as piracy and called on Monday for a European-led naval mission to ensure safe shipping through the Strait, a strategic waterway for oil transportation.

Adamson said the next step for the operator would be to try and get somebody on board to check up on the crew, but that he had no timeline for when the crew might be repatriated.

“We haven’t had any direct response from the Iranian authorities about visiting the vessel as yet but we hope we will have that soon,” he said.

“All the appropriate governments and embassies are supporting and helping us.”