Libyan officials say Haftar's forces fighting Daesh in south

LNA forces started military attacks on internationally-recognized government in Tripoli since April. (File/AFP)
Updated 16 June 2019
0

Libyan officials say Haftar's forces fighting Daesh in south

  • Haftar’s officials said they began the attacks in a mountainous area earlier this week
  • Daesh confirmed the attacks and said they also killed a number of LNA fighters

CAIRO: Libyan officials say forces loyal to military commander Khalifa Haftar are pursuing Daesh militants in the country’s south, killing more than a dozen militants over the past three days.
The officials said Sunday that the self-styled Libyan National Army began its attack on a militant hideout in the mountainous area of Haruj earlier this week. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to brief the media.
The LNA media center said Friday that the Daesh militants were responsible for recent attacks in southern areas.
Daesh acknowledged the ongoing LNA attack and claimed to have killed and wounded dozens of LNA troops.
Haftar’s forces launched a military offensive in early April aimed at taking the capital, Tripoli, from a United Nations-aligned but weak administration.


Stena Impero operator says tanker’s crew safe and well

Updated 17 min 33 sec ago
0

Stena Impero operator says tanker’s crew safe and well

  • ‘... they’re all okay and in good health and they’re getting good cooperation with the Iranians on board the vessel’

STOCKHOLM: All 23 crew on a British-flagged tanker seized last week by Iran in the Strait of Hormuz are safe and well, the vessel’s Swedish operator Stena Bulk said on Wednesday after speaking to them.

Iran said on Saturday it had seized the Stena Impero because it had collided with a fishing boat. Stena Bulk has said it has received no evidence of such a collision.

“We had direct contact with the crew on board the vessel last night by telephone and they’re all okay and in good health and they’re getting good cooperation with the Iranians on board,” the firm’s spokesman Pat Adamson said.

Its CEO Erik Hanell said he hoped Tuesday’s contact was “a first sign that we will soon see more positive progress from the Iranian authorities.”

Britain described the seizure as piracy and called on Monday for a European-led naval mission to ensure safe shipping through the Strait, a strategic waterway for oil transportation.

Adamson said the next step for the operator would be to try and get somebody on board to check up on the crew, but that he had no timeline for when the crew might be repatriated.

“We haven’t had any direct response from the Iranian authorities about visiting the vessel as yet but we hope we will have that soon,” he said.

“All the appropriate governments and embassies are supporting and helping us.”