Sudan’s military council dismisses public prosecutor, appoints replacement

Sudan’s military council on Thursday dismissed public prosecutor Alwaleed Sayed Ahmed Mahmoud and appointed Abdullah Ahmed Abdullah to succeed him. (File/AFP)
Updated 20 June 2019
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Sudan’s military council dismisses public prosecutor, appoints replacement

  • A top Sudanese general said Thursday that the mastermind behind a deadly crackdown on protesters has been identified, but refused to name him
  • Crowds of protesters were violently dispersed on June 3 by men in military uniforms, shooting and beating demonstrators who had participated in a weeks-long sit-in outside the army headquarters

CAIRO: Sudan’s military council on Thursday dismissed public prosecutor Alwaleed Sayed Ahmed Mahmoud and appointed Abdullah Ahmed Abdullah to succeed him, prosecution sources told Reuters.

The move comes as authorities investigate the dispersal of a protest camp outside the Defense Ministry in Khartoum that killed dozens on June 3.
A top Sudanese general said Thursday that the mastermind behind a deadly crackdown on protesters has been identified, but refused to name him saying it would impact a probe into the raid.
Crowds of protesters were violently dispersed on June 3 by men in military uniforms, shooting and beating demonstrators who had participated in a weeks-long sit-in outside the army headquarters.
Protesters and witnesses allege that the crackdown was carried out by members of the feared paramilitary Rapid Support Forces, whose commander Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo is the deputy chief of the country’s ruling military council.
But Dagalo, widely known as Himeidti, said on Thursday that an investigation into the crackdown has so far led to the identity of the man who planned the raid.
“We have identified the man responsible” for dispersing the protest camp, Dagalo said without naming the individual, adding “there’s no need to impact the investigation.”
“Whoever it is, whether from regular forces or a civilian, will be brought to trial. The investigation will be transparent and the trial will be public.”
The military council has steadfastly denied it had ordered the dispersal of the sit-in.
On Thursday also defended Rapid Support Forces saying anybody could wear the unit’s uniform as it was easily available in the market.
“We arrested a general yesterday for distributing IDs of the RSF,” Dagalo said.
“We have also arrested 23 people in Port Sudan who were not RSF members but who were wearing RSF uniforms and checking people.”
Dozens were killed and hundreds wounded in the June 3 crackdown, launched days after protest leaders and generals failed to reach an agreement over who should head a new governing body — a civilian or soldier.
The generals, who seized power after the army ousted longtime ruler Omar Al-Bashir on April 11 following a popular uprising, have so far resisted to transfer power to a civilian administration.
On Wednesday, the chief of the military council, General Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan called on protest leaders to resume talks without any conditions.
Protest leaders have expressed readiness to resume talks but on certain conditions.
They insist an Internet blackout imposed after they launched a civil disobedience campaign this month be brought to an end.
They are also seeking an international probe into the killings and the acceptance of all earlier agreements reached in previous negotiations with the generals prior to the crackdown.


Stena Impero operator says tanker’s crew safe and well

Updated 32 min 57 sec ago
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Stena Impero operator says tanker’s crew safe and well

  • ‘... they’re all okay and in good health and they’re getting good cooperation with the Iranians on board the vessel’

STOCKHOLM: All 23 crew on a British-flagged tanker seized last week by Iran in the Strait of Hormuz are safe and well, the vessel’s Swedish operator Stena Bulk said on Wednesday after speaking to them.

Iran said on Saturday it had seized the Stena Impero because it had collided with a fishing boat. Stena Bulk has said it has received no evidence of such a collision.

“We had direct contact with the crew on board the vessel last night by telephone and they’re all okay and in good health and they’re getting good cooperation with the Iranians on board,” the firm’s spokesman Pat Adamson said.

Its CEO Erik Hanell said he hoped Tuesday’s contact was “a first sign that we will soon see more positive progress from the Iranian authorities.”

Britain described the seizure as piracy and called on Monday for a European-led naval mission to ensure safe shipping through the Strait, a strategic waterway for oil transportation.

Adamson said the next step for the operator would be to try and get somebody on board to check up on the crew, but that he had no timeline for when the crew might be repatriated.

“We haven’t had any direct response from the Iranian authorities about visiting the vessel as yet but we hope we will have that soon,” he said.

“All the appropriate governments and embassies are supporting and helping us.”