Myriam Fares apologizes to Egyptian fans after backlash

Updated 24 June 2019
0

Myriam Fares apologizes to Egyptian fans after backlash

DUBAI: Lebanese pop superstar Myriam Fares has apologized to her Egyptian fans over comments she made at a press conference for the Moroccan Mawazine Festival on Saturday.

In a press appearance before her gig at the music festival, the star was questioned by a journalist and asked why she doesn’t perform in Egypt as much as she used to.

“I will be honest with you,” she told the journalist, “I’ve grown over the years and so did the pay and my demands, so it became a bit heavy on Egypt.”

The comment triggered intense backlash on social media, with many offended Twitter users using the platform to vent.

Egyptian singer and actor Ahmed Fahmi, who starred alongside Fares in a 2014 TV show, He replied to her comments sarcastically, tweeting: “Now you are too much for Egypt. Learn from the stars of the Arab world. You will understand that you did the biggest mistake of your life with this statement.”

Then, Egyptian songwriter Amir Teima tweeted: “Most Lebanese megastars like Elissa, Nawal (El Zoghby), Nancy (Ajram), Ragheb (Alama), and the great Majida El-Roumi have performed in Egypt after the revolution. You and I both know they get paid more than you do. Don’t attack Egypt; if it’s not out of respect, do it out of wit.”

Now, Fares has replied to the comments and has blamed the misunderstanding on her Lebanese dialect, saying: “I always say in my interviews that although I started from Lebanon, I earned my stardom in Egypt. I feel sorry that my Lebanese dialect and short reply created chances for a misunderstanding.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Myriam Music (@myriammusicofficial) on

She ended her Instagram apology by saying, “Long live Egypt.”


Season of change: Jeddah gets the party started

Jeddah Season. (Huda Bashatah)
Updated 22 July 2019
0

Season of change: Jeddah gets the party started

Here are some highlights from the first Jeddah Season — from K-pop superstars to Shakespeare in Arabic. 

Sporting sensations 

The first Jeddah Season kicked off with a WWE Super ShowDown at King Abdullah Sports City. The event featured wrestling legends including Goldberg, the Undertaker, Triple H, and Randy Orton. It also included the largest Battle Royal Match in WWE history, with 50 stars scrapping it out simultaneously. Hometown boy Mansoor Al-Shehail (pictured) emerged victorious. “I can’t ask for anything better,” he said.

On July 12, British boxer Amir Khan claimed the WBC International Welterweight belt with a fourth-round stoppage against Australia’s Billy Dib. Khan has since claimed that he will return to the Kingdom in November to face Filipino legend Manny Pacquiao.

Arab legends

Music has been a major focus of Jeddah Season, and several of the region’s most popular performers visited the city over the past month to thrill their fans. Lebanese icons Nancy Ajram and ‘King of Romance’ Wael Kfoury (pictured), local legend Mohammad Abdo, Egyptian favourites Amr Diab, Angham, and Mohamed Hamaki, and Khaleeji stars Ahlam and Rashed Al-Majed were among those who performed.

International superstars

It wasn’t just regional artists who took to the stage during Jeddah Season — numerous international A-listers also arrived in the city to put on a show. From K-pop chart-toppers Super Junior (pictured) and Stray Kids, through big-name DJs including Martin Garrix, Steve Aoki, Marshmello and Dutch duo Afrojack and R3hab, through Nineties hit-machine Backstreet Boys, to the final night’s Jeddah World Festival’s stellar lineup — which included Future, 50 Cent, ex-One Directioner Liam Payne, and Janet Jackson — Jeddah has witnessed some of the biggest names in music playing live over the past few weeks.

The light fantastic 

Dazzling visual displays were a central part of Jeddah Season. The Flame, Fountain & Laser show in front of XJED was choreographed to regional and international pop hits and became a big hit with visitors. Elsewhere, the Glow Garden — “where art, technology and innovation immerse” — became equally popular, as the underwater world was recreated in Al Hamra. And rounding off most nights were the spectacular fireworks on Jeddah Waterfront.

Shakespeare in Saudi

For a shot of high-brow culture, Jeddah Season also saw a staging of William Shakespeare’s acclaimed tragedy “King Lear” about a monarch who — through his inability to accept criticism and only listen to those who falsely proclaim their love and respect for him — is driven to the verge of insanity. The play, which was translated into Arabic, starred Egyptian actor Yehia El-Fakharany (pictured) in the demanding leading role, with Heba Magdi, Rania Farid Shawki, and Riham Abdel-Ghafour also among the cast. In a press conference prior to opening night, El-Fakharany praised the “arts renaissance occurring in Saudi Arabia,” saying it would “surely inspire the new generation.”

Big-top bonanza 

Jeddah Season saw one of the oldest forms of mass entertainment making a splash — the circus. With the international stylings of Le Teatro Circus — magic, acrobatics, live music, and, as the name suggests, a healthy dose of the dramatic — and the US-based Circus 1903 — a dip into the ‘golden age’ of the traveling show around the turn of the century, complete with knife throwers, high-wire acts, and life-size elephant puppets — in town, Jeddawis were enthralled by this throwback to old-school entertainment.

 

Blue is the color 

American performance artists Blue Man Group were one of the big hits of Jeddah Season with their trademark mix of weird and wonderful music and art — and no dialogue. Judging by the troupe leader Scott Speiser’s interview with Arab News, the performers enjoyed their time in the Kingdom just as much as the audiences did. “The Saudi people seem to have really embraced the show and that makes it even more fun and fulfilling for us,” he said. “The audience here loves to clap in rhythm with the music. We weren’t really ready for it. And, well, we just love it!”