Kyoto mayor steps into #KimOhNo row over Kardashian line

Japanese women wearing kimonos. (File/Reuters)
Updated 01 July 2019
0

Kyoto mayor steps into #KimOhNo row over Kardashian line

  • The American pop culture icon sparked a social media storm last week when she unveiled the new line
  • Kimono literally means “something to wear,” while Kardashian West’s use of it is a play on her first name

TOKYO: The mayor of Japan’s ancient capital Kyoto has entered into an unlikely correspondence with the queen of selfies Kim Kardashian West, asking her to reconsider naming her shapewear line “Kimono.”
The American pop culture icon sparked a social media storm last week when she unveiled the new line, with some in Japan and abroad accusing her of disrespecting the traditional outfit.
And now the mayor has waded into the debate — being had on Twitter under the hashtag #KimOhNo — penning a letter to the star to ask her to reconsider, Kyoto officials told AFP.
“We’re concerned that a wrong understanding of kimono will spread since Ms. Kardashian is such a powerful influencer,” said Mai Sakai, a Kyoto city official in charge of traditional crafts.
“(I) ask you to reconsider your decision of using the name Kimono in your trademark,” Kyoto Mayor Daisaku Kadokawa wrote in an English-language letter sent to Kardashian West.
“Kimono is a traditional ethnic dress fostered in our rich nature and history,” he wrote, asking her to visit the city to experience kimono culture.
Kimono literally means “something to wear,” while Kardashian West’s use of it is a play on her first name.
The reality television star told the New York Times that she had no plans to produce clothes that “would in any way resemble or dishonor the traditional garment.”
Once a standard of the Japanese wardrobe, the kimono is now often reserved for special occasions, such as weddings and coming-of-age ceremonies, and is mostly worn by women.
And while the elaborate outfits might appear to have little in common with the snug garb being offered by Kardashian West, kimonos are not only often hugely expensive but known for being hard to wear.
Women frequently hire experts to dress them in kimono because the outfit requires seemingly endless nipping, tucking and strapping.


What We Are Buying Today: Yataghan Jewellery

Updated 20 July 2019
0

What We Are Buying Today: Yataghan Jewellery

In January, my family celebrated my birthday by gifting me a “Hubb Collection” necklace that I had wanted ever since I laid eyes on it, when one of my relatives wore it.

The design of the word ‘Love’ — written in Arabic Farsi font and angled in a way that makes it heart-shaped — fascinated me, and I have worn the necklace ever since I got it, partly out of sentiment, but also because I find it so beautiful and unique.

Jeddah-based Yataghan Jewellery — the maker of the “Hubb Collection” — has a variety of gold designs, stackable jewel-ornamented hexagon rings, necklaces, bracelets and rings engraved in Arabic Farsi.

The store’s Instagram account @yataghanjewellery documents its trademark pieces and shares customers’ experiences along with how they choose to stack their Yataghan pieces.

Customer favorites include their Allah necklace, and the “Hubb Collection” (rings, necklaces and bracelets in crystalized or standard gold, silver or rose gold with a single colorful or silver crystal).