Luckin Coffee startup backer raises over $2bn

China’s Centurium Capital, a big backer of domestic startup Luckin Coffee, said it has raised more than $2 billion in its debut fund. (Reuters)
Updated 03 July 2019
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Luckin Coffee startup backer raises over $2bn

  • US dollar fund will help firm invest in Chinese VIEs
  • Centurium invested $180m in Luckin Coffee’s first two funding rounds

HONG KONG: China’s Centurium Capital, a big backer of domestic startup Luckin Coffee, said it has raised more than $2 billion in its debut fund, giving the private equity firm more firepower to cut deals involving the world’s second-largest economy.

The firm, co-founded by the former head of Warburg Pincus Asia Pacific, David Li, said on Wednesday that Centurium Capital Partners 2018 L.P. raised the sum in US dollars.

The fund secured strong interest from global investors, known as limited partners (LPs), such as pension funds, sovereign wealth funds and funds-of-funds, it said.

Investors in the fund include Singapore’s GIC Pte Ltd. and Temasek Holdings, Canada’s Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan, China Investment Corp. (CIC) and US pension fund Washington State Investment Board, said two people with knowledge of the matter.

Centurium declined to comment on the fund’s LPs. All the investors didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment.

The US dollar fund will help Centurium invest in Chinese firms that use overseas structures such as variable-interest entities.

Centurium joins several China-focused private equity and venture capital managers who raised $17.3 billion in dollar-denominated funds in the first half of the year, versus $13 billion over the same period last year, according to data provider Preqin.

Launched in March 2018, Centurium’s maiden fund reached the first close of nearly $1 billion three months later and has beaten the $1.5 billion and $1.98 billion fundraising targets since then.

Beijing-based Centurium was set up in early 2017 by Li and two other partners. Li had worked with Warburg Pincus for 14 years and led several investments for the US buyout firm in China, including in top car rental service provider CAR Inc. 

“After helping several entrepreneurs fulfill their entrepreneurial dream for so many years, I also have my dream of launching our own (investment) firm,” Li said.

Centurium primarily seeks control and significant minority investment opportunities across China’s consumer, services and health care sectors where it looks to boost operational efficiency and tackle structural deficiencies.

“The Chinese business environment nowadays needs a new generation of investors that combine the global PE best practice and local experience,” Li said.

“Instead of being a pure capital provider, firms like Centurium can better integrate with local markets, and be more efficient and responsive to provide bespoke local solutions to new challenges and opportunities.”

Centurium began to gain recognition last year when it made a big bet on Luckin Coffee, the Chinese challenger to Starbucks Corp. It invested about $180 million in Luckin in the startup’s first two fundraising rounds.

Li said that Centurium has invested about 40 percent of the capital raised in the debut fund in five firms in China and aims to fully deploy the fund by the end of next year.


Funds managing $2 trillion urge cement makers to act on climate impact

A general view of Gulf Cement Company in Ghalilah, Ras al Khaimah, United Arab Emirates July 16, 2019. (REUTERS)
Updated 23 July 2019
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Funds managing $2 trillion urge cement makers to act on climate impact

  • The cement industry produces 7 percent of the world’s carbon dioxide emissions, according to the International Energy Agency, meaning that if it were a country, it would be the third largest emitter, behind the US and China

LONDON: European funds managing $2 trillion in assets called on cement companies to slash their greenhouse gas emissions on Monday, warning that a failure to do so could put their business models at risk.
Some asset managers are ramping up engagement with heavy polluters to demand a faster transition to a cleaner economy.
“The cement sector needs to dramatically reduce the contribution it makes to climate change,” said Stephanie Pfeifer, CEO of the Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change, which has more than 170 members, mainly European pension funds and asset managers. “This is ultimately a business-critical issue for the sector,” Pfeifer said in a statement.
The group said investors had written to cement or construction materials companies including Ireland’s CRH, Franco-Swiss group LafargeHolcim and France’s St. Gobain to demand they achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050.
They also noted that Germany’s HeidelbergCement had already adopted the target. The funds urged all cement companies to align themselves with the 2015 Paris agreement to combat global warming, engage with policymakers to ensure an orderly transition to a low carbon economy, and increase their reporting of climate risk.
“Construction materials companies may ultimately risk divestment and lack of access to capital as an increasing number of investors seek to exclude highly carbon-intensive sectors from their portfolios,” said Vincent Kaufmann, CEO of the Ethos Foundation.

FASTFACT

The cement industry produces 7 percent of the world’s carbon dioxide emissions, according to the International Energy Agency.

Signatories collectively manage assets worth $2 trillion and include Aberdeen Standard Investments, BNP Paribas Asset Management, Sarasin & Partners and Hermes EOS.
Although funds are increasingly engaging with companies from airlines to carmakers on emissions, few are calling for the systemic transformation of the global economic system that scientists increasingly argue is needed to prevent runaway climate breakdown.
The cement industry produces 7 percent of the world’s carbon dioxide emissions, according to the International Energy Agency, meaning that if it were a country, it would be the third largest emitter, behind the US and China.
With climate campaigners traditionally focused on fossil fuel companies, the European cement sector has received comparatively little scrutiny until recently.
On Tuesday, police arrested six climate activists from civil disobedience group Extinction Rebellion at a protest aimed at disrupting a site in east London belonging to London Concrete, a unit of LafargeHolcim.
In June last year, a report from think-tank Chatham House concluded that although there was no “silver bullet” to reduce emissions from cement, it should be possible to deploy a range of policies and technologies to achieve deep decarbonization.