What We Are Reading Today: Emeralds of Oz by Peter Guzzardi

Updated 04 July 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Emeralds of Oz by Peter Guzzardi

  • Guzzardi invites us all to consider the value of compassion, fear, faith in ourselves, home, compassion

In the bestselling tradition of “Everything I Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten,” a wise and inspiring collection of life lessons drawn from one of the most beloved movies of all time: The Wizard of Oz, says a review published on goodreads.com.

After a lifetime in book publishing, Peter Guzzardi had edited a remarkable group of diverse authors, from Stephen Hawking to Deepak Chopra, from Carol Burnett to Douglas Adams, from Byron Katie to Geneen Roth. Yet everything he had learned from working with them felt oddly familiar. One day it suddenly became clear: All that wisdom had its roots in a film he had loved as a child, The Wizard of Oz.

In this book, we discover what the most-watched film in history has to teach us. Moving seamlessly between the entertaining and profound Guzzardi invites us all to consider the value of compassion, fear, faith in ourselves, home, compassion, and more, as we each face our own heroic journey through life. With that knowledge we become free to embark on our own walk down the yellow brick road, having activated the magical power we possessed all along.

Written with the grace and insight of “It’s Not Easy Being Green” or “The World According to Mister Rogers,” this book is an instant classic, sure to change the way we think about this legendary movie—and our own lives.


What We Are Reading Today: Bettyville

Updated 24 July 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Bettyville

Author: George Hodgman

Bettyville is a touching memoir about the relationship between a mother and son.
It is a memoir written with love by a man who returns home to care for his aging mother.
Author George Hodgman captures life as it was in small-town Missouri, where he grew up.
Hodgman “is a good writer, knows how to use repetition to good effect, knows how to tease the reader and then pull away, later returning to tease again,” said a review in goodreads.com.
“The memoir would especially appeal to those with family members with dementia as well as those who want to understand how it feels to want not to hurt or disappoint the ones you love,” it added.
“There are chapters on the colorful residents; there are sections on George’s publishing career; there are some awkward and frustrating stories from his childhood; and there are memories of his parents and grandmother,” said the review.
Hodgman died on Saturday at his home in Manhattan. He was 60.
“The book is instantly engaging, as Hodgman has a wry sense of humor, one he uses to keep others at a distance,” Eloise Kinney wrote in a review in Booklist.
“Yet the book is also devastatingly touching.”