UNESCO declares Bahrain’s Dilmun Burial Mounds a World Heritage Site

The burial grounds are located in the western part of the island nation. (Shutterstock)
Updated 07 July 2019

UNESCO declares Bahrain’s Dilmun Burial Mounds a World Heritage Site

  • It is Bahrain’s third World Heritage Site
  • The burial grounds include 21 archeological sites built between 2050 and 1750 BC

DUBAI: The UNESCO World Heritage Committee added Bahrain’s Dilmun Burial Mounds to the World Heritage List on Saturday for its “globally unique characteristics.”

The burial grounds, located in the western part of the island nation, include 21 archeological sites built between 2050 and 1750 BC, which demonstrate evidence of the early Dilmun civilization, when Bahrain became a trade hub.

“These tombs illustrate globally unique characteristics, not only in terms of their number, density and scale, but also in terms of details such as burial chambers equipped with alcoves,” UNESCO said in a statement.

Sheikha Mai bint Mohammed Al-Khalifa, president of the Bahrain Authority for Culture and Antiquities, said “that the Dilmun Burial Mounds is a living proof of Bahrain’s distinguished cultural heritage,” the Bahrain News Agency reported.

The landmark includes six burial mound fields that consist of a few dozen to a several thousand tumuli. The other 15 include 13 single royal mounds and two pairs of royal mounds spread across various towns in Madinat Hamad, Janabiyah and A’ali.

The Dilmun Burial Mounds is Bahrain’s third World Heritage Site, after Ancient Qal’at al-Bahrain Harbor City and Capital of Dilmun in 2005 and the Offshore Pearling Sites in Muharraq in 2012.


Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

Updated 19 August 2019

Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

  • Then Russian Navy Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko wrote the letter when he was a 36-year-old aboard the Sulak
ANCHORAGE, Alaska: A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska.
Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported.
“I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.”
Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response from the person who finds it.
Reporters from the state-owned Russian media network, Russia-1, tracked down the original writer, Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko, KTUU reported.
He was skeptical he wrote the note until he saw his signature on the bottom.
“There — exactly!” he exclaimed.
The message was sent while the then 36-year-old was aboard the Sulak, Botsanenko said. Botsanenko shed tears when the Russian television reporter told him the Sulak was sold for scrap in the 1990s.
Botsanenko also showed the reporter some souvenirs from his time on the ship, including the autograph of the wife of a famous Russian spy and Japanese liquor bottles, the latter kept over his wife’s protests.
Ivanoff’s discovery of the bottle was first reported by Nome radio station KNOM.