Thousands in Bosnia march in memory of Srebrenica massacre

The 100-kilomenter march traces a route taken by Bosnian Muslims who fled the eastern Bosnian town of Srebrenica when it was captured by Bosnian Serbs during the war in the 1990s. (AP Photo)
Updated 08 July 2019

Thousands in Bosnia march in memory of Srebrenica massacre

  • More than 8,000 men and boys were killed in and around the UN-protected enclave in July 1995
  • Many of those fleeing Srebrenica in scorching heat and without food or water were ambushed along the forest routes

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina: Thousands of people joined a peace march on Monday through forests in Bosnia in memory of the worst massacre in Europe since World War II.
The 100-kilomenter (60-mile) march traces a route taken by Bosnian Muslims while they fled the eastern Bosnian town of Srebrenica when it was captured by Bosnian Serbs during the war in the 1990s.
More than 8,000 men and boys were killed in and around the UN-protected enclave in July 1995. Although the massacre was branded genocide by international courts, Serbian and Bosnia Serb officials still deny that the worst kind of crime happened.
Many of those fleeing Srebrenica in scorching heat and without food or water were ambushed along the forest routes. They were either shot on the spot, or taken to collective centers where they were executed and thrown into mass graves.
“I took part in this march because I want to feel what they (the victims) felt when they did it,” teenager Zehrudin Bosnjakovic said. “It’s hard for me now, but I’m sure it was much harder for them back then.”
So far, the remains of more than 6,600 people have been found and buried at a memorial center near Srebrenica. The remains of 33 more victims will be put to rest on the 24th anniversary of the massacre next week.
“We have to work more to raise awareness of our people about the importance of this march,” said Mevludin Ibrisevic, a Bosnian refugee from Australia, who was among about 5,000 people taking part. “We have to relive the memories on those who have died while escaping.”


NASA investigating first crime committed in space: report

Updated 36 min 36 sec ago

NASA investigating first crime committed in space: report

  • Astronaut Anne McClain is accused of improperly accessing her partner’s private financial records while aboard the International Space Station
  • McClain’s lawyer said the astronaut accessed the account only to monitor the couple’s combined finances

WASHINGTON: US space agency NASA is investigating what may be the first crime committed in outer space, The New York Times reported Saturday.
Astronaut Anne McClain is accused of identity theft and improperly accessing her estranged wife’s private financial records while on a sixth-month mission aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Times said.
The astronaut’s spouse Summer Worden filed a complaint earlier this year with the Federal Trade Commission after learning McClain had accessed her bank account without permission, while Worden’s family filed another with NASA’s Office of Inspector General, according to the newspaper.
McClain’s lawyer said the astronaut had done nothing wrong and accessed the bank records while aboard the ISS in order to monitor the couple’s combined finances — something she had done over the course of their relationship, the Times reported.
NASA investigators have contacted both women, according to the newspaper.
McClain, who returned to Earth in June, gained fame for being one of two women picked for a historic all-female spacewalk, but NASA scrapped the planned walk in March due to a lack of well-fitting spacesuits, sparking accusations of sexism.
Worden said the FTC has not responded to the identity theft report, but that an investigator specializing in criminal cases with NASA’s Office of Inspector General has been looking into the accusation, according to the Times.