British inventor Dyson buys Singapore’s ‘priciest penthouse’

The penthouse is on the top three floors of Wallich Residence in Singapore’s business district. (File/AFP)
Updated 11 July 2019
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British inventor Dyson buys Singapore’s ‘priciest penthouse’

  • The penthouse is located in the tallest building in Singapore
  • Company spokesman said the purchase coincides with Dyson’s desire to focus more on the Asian market

SINGAPORE: British billionaire inventor James Dyson has paid a reported $54 million for Singapore’s biggest, most expensive penthouse: a three-floor residence with a rooftop terrace, private pool, and jacuzzi.
His electric appliance company, known for its bagless vacuum cleaners, hand dryers and fans, announced this year it was shifting its global headquarters from England to the city-state to be closer to Asian markets.
The company also plans to produce electric cars there, as part of its expansion east after Britain’s decision in 2016 to leave the EU.
The Brexit-backing tycoon purchased the 1,960 square meter “super penthouse” for almost $54 million, Singapore’s Business Times newspaper reported, without citing a source.
A land title document seen by AFP lists Dyson and his wife Deirdre as joint tenants of the 99-year leasehold property, with the sale registered on June 20.
The company confirmed Dyson, 72, had bought a property in the city.
The luxury home at Wallich Residence sits on the top three floors of a 64-story, 290-meter high tower — the tallest in Singapore — which is in the business district and has panoramic views over the area.
It has five bedrooms, each with their own en-suite bathroom, a private garden and a viewing deck on the 62nd floor, according to a sales brochure for the property.
It also has a private lift.
The purchase is the most expensive for a condo in the city-state — where property is among the world’s costliest — beating the nearly $44 million paid by Facebook co-founder Eduardo Saverin for a penthouse in 2017, according to the newspaper.
But it is below a price tag of over $73 million originally sought for the Wallich property.
A Dyson spokesman declined to give details of the purchase but told AFP: “Given the decision to locate the headquarters in Singapore and the growing focus of the company’s business in the region, of course James Dyson has bought a property there.”


Widespread blackout hits Venezuela, government blames ‘electromagnetic attack’

People pour to the streets in Caracas on July 22, 2019 as the capital and other parts of Venezuela are being hit by a massive power cut. (AFP)
Updated 14 min 57 sec ago
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Widespread blackout hits Venezuela, government blames ‘electromagnetic attack’

  • Venezuelan Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez said the outage on Monday was caused by an “electromagnetic attack,” without providing evidence

CARACAS: More than half of Venezuela’s 23 states lost power on Monday, according to Reuters witnesses and reports on social media, a blackout the government blamed on an “electromagnetic attack.”
It was the first blackout to include the capital, Caracas, since March, when the government blamed the opposition and United States for a series of power outages that left millions of people without running water and telecommunications.
The blackouts exacerbated an economic crisis that has halved the size of the economy.
Venezuelan Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez said the outage on Monday was caused by an “electromagnetic attack,” without providing evidence. He added that authorities were in the process of re-establishing service.
Power returned for about 10 minutes to parts of southeastern Bolivar state, site of the Guri hydroelectric dam — the source of most of Venezuela’s generation — but went out again, according to a Reuters witness. Electricity was still out throughout Caracas.
“It terrifies me to think we are facing a national blackout again,” said Maria Luisa Rivero, a 45-year-old business owner from the city of Valencia, in the central state of Carabobo.
“The first thing I did was run to freeze my food so that it does not go bad like it did like the last time in March. It costs a lot to buy food just to lose it,” she said.
The oil-rich country’s hyperinflationary economic crisis has led to widespread shortages in food and medicine, prompting over 4 million Venezuelans to leave the country.
Venezuela’s national power grid has fallen into disrepair after years of inadequate investment and maintenance, according to the opposition and power experts.
“These blackouts are catastrophic,” said 51-year-old janitor Bernardina Guerra, who lives in Caracas. “I live in the eastern part of the city and there the lights go out every day. Each day things are worse.”