Roger Federer feels ‘strange’ being in Wimbledon final, 16 years after first

Switzerland's Roger Federer celebrates after winning his semifinal match against Spain's Rafael Nadal. (Reuters)
Updated 13 July 2019
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Roger Federer feels ‘strange’ being in Wimbledon final, 16 years after first

  • On Sunday, he will face world number one Novak Djokovic
  • Federer won his first Wimbledon in 2003

WIMBLEDON, London: Roger Federer admitted Friday that it felt "strange" he and Serena Williams will compete for Wimbledon titles this weekend, 16 years after he made his Grand Slam breakthrough.
The 37-year-old Swiss reached his 12th final at the All England Club with a 7-6 (7/3), 1-6, 6-3, 6-4 defeat of old rival Rafael Nadal.
On Sunday, he will face world number one Novak Djokovic where he hopes to capture a ninth Wimbledon and record-extending 21st Grand Slam crown.
Federer won his first Wimbledon in 2003, beating Mark Philippoussis in the final.
That same weekend, Serena was beating sister Venus for the second successive year in the women's final.
On Saturday, Serena faces Simona Halep for an eighth Wimbledon title and record-equalling 24th major.
"Yeah, it's definitely a bit unusual, a bit strange," said Federer who will be the third oldest man to play in a Slam final on Sunday.
"I hope it's going to happen again for somebody, to have such a big span between the first final.
"It's definitely special I think for both of us. Serena was even earlier on tour than me because she made the breakthrough earlier. It's amazing what she's been able to do.
"For me, it's not something I ever expected. Winning that '03 title was something so surreal that it's nice to be back in another final. Means really a lot to me."
Federer's win over Nadal on Friday came in the pair's 40th career meeting and 11 years after the Spaniard triumphed in a mesmeric, epic final.
The Swiss needed five match points to secure the victory, his 16th of their 15-year rivalry.
"It lived up to the hype, especially from coming out of the gates, we were both playing very well.
"Then the climax at the end with the crazy last game, some tough rallies there. It had everything at the end, which was great. I'm just relieved it's all over at this point.
"But it's definitely going to go down as one of my favourite matches to look back at because it's Rafa, it's at Wimbledon."
Djokovic leads Federer 25-22 in career meetings with the Serb holding a 2-1 edge in Wimbledon clashes.
Federer won their first duel in the 2012 semi-finals but Djokovic triumphed in the 2014 and 2015 championship matches.
Overall, Djokovic holds a 9-6 edge in the Slams.
However, Federer said he won't be over-awed by the challenge as he chases a 21st major and Djokovic targets a 16th.
"Age kicks in. I know it's not over yet. There's no point to start partying tonight or get too emotional, too happy about it, even though I am extremely happy," said Federer.
"I think I can with experience really separate the two.
"If it was the end of the tournament, it would be very different right now. I'd be speaking very different, feeling very different. There is fortunately, one more.
"It's great on many levels. But got to put my head down and stay focused."


Russian boxer Maxim Dadashev dies after fight against Subriel Matias

Updated 23 July 2019
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Russian boxer Maxim Dadashev dies after fight against Subriel Matias

  • Doctors operated to relieve pressure from swelling on his brain
  • Dadashev, known as “Mad Max,” was unable to walk to the dressing room and was immediately hospitalized

MOSCOW: Russian boxer Maxim Dadashev has died from brain injuries sustained in a fight in Maryland, the Russian boxing federation announced on Tuesday.
“Maxim Dadashev has died in the United States following injuries sustained during his fight with Subriel Matias,” the federation said in a statement.
The 28-year-old underwent emergency brain surgery in Washington after his super-lightweight bout with Puerto Rican Matias on Friday was stopped after the 11th round by his cornerman James “Buddy” McGirt.
Dadashev, known as “Mad Max,” was unable to walk to the dressing room and was immediately hospitalized.
Doctors operated to relieve pressure from swelling on his brain.
McGirt, who said after the fight he “couldn’t convince” his fighter to stop but opted to throw in the towel when he saw him “getting hit with more and more clean shots as the fight went on,” told ESPN on Tuesday he was wracking his brain wondering if he could have done things differently.
“It just makes you realize what type of sport we’re in, man,” McGirt told ESPN — which streamed the fight on its ESPN+ platform.
“He did everything right in training, no problems, no nothing. My mind is like really running crazy, right now. Like what could I have done differently? But at the end of the day, everything was fine (in training).
“He seemed OK, he was ready, but it’s the sport that we’re in. It just takes one punch, man.”
Russian boxing chief Umar Kremlev told Russian media that Dadashev’s body would be repatriated home and that his family would receive financial aid.
Dadashev’s widow, Elizaveta Apushkina, also issued a statement, confirming the fighter’s death “with great sadness.”
She said: “He was a very kind person who fought until the very end. Our son will continue be raised to be a great man like his father,” she said of the St. Petersburg-born fighter who trained in Oxnard, California.
Dadashev took an unbeaten 13-0 record into the 140-pound non-title fight.
Dadashev, whose manager Egis Klimas also handles Vasiliy Lomachenko and Sergey Kovalev, turned pro in April of 2016 and relocated to Southern California to pursue his ring ambitions, eventually signing with promoters Top Rank.
Top Rank chairman Bob Arum issued a statement recalling Dadashev as “a terrific young man.”
ESPN, which streamed the bout on ESPN+, also issued a statement.
“Our heartfelt thoughts are with Dadashev’s family, friends, trainers and the team at Top Rank,” the statement said.
Dadashev was rated in the top five by two world sanctioning organizations going into Friday’s fight in suburban Washington DC, an elimination bout for the right to become mandatory challenger for Josh Taylor’s IBF title.
Matias dominated, and after the 11th round McGirt could be heard telling Dadashev “I’m going to stop it, Max,” even as Dadashev shook his head.
McGirt, himself a former two-weight world champion, then told the referee: “That’s it.”